2-Introduction - Object-Oriented Programming and Design Thienne Johnson Introduction to OOP Agenda Historical perspective Object Model and

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Object-Oriented Programming and Design Thienne Johnson Introduction to OOP
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Agenda Historical perspective Object Model and Object-Oriented Programming OOP Principles 2
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Object-Oriented Technology OOT began with Simula 67 (acronym for simulation language). Why this new language? To build accurate models of complex working systems. The modularization occurs at the physical object level (not at a procedural level) . 3
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The Software Crisis Corporations continue to become more dependent on information Their ability to manage data decreases. The problem is the software, not the hardware. The Software Crisis How often is software delivered on time, under budget, and does what it„s supposed to? The software is not flexible enough to handle rapid changes. The crisis was recognized in the 1960„s. “Software Engineer” popularized during the 1968 NATO Software Engineering Conference 4
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Underlying Challenges Complexity Information system Context of regulations, global environment Longevity and evolution Legacy systems High user expectations Before: send paychecks to outsourcing Now: look it up online Complexity of the data 24x7 availability Connected to other data sources 5
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How Software is Constructed Wanted: Robust large-scale applications that can evolve It isn„t easy! Modular Programming Break large-scale problems into smaller components that are constructed independently. Programs are viewed as a collection of procedures, each containing a sequence of instructions. 6
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Modular Programming Subroutine (1950s) Provided a natural division of labor Could be reused in other programs 7
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Modular Programming (cont.) 8 Structured Programming and Design (1960s) SPD recommended programming with a limited set of control structures (no go to statements, single returns from functions). Sequence, selection, repetition, recursion Program design was at the level of subroutines. Functional decomposition
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Modular programming (cont.) 9
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Functional Decomposition 10
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1. Structured programming has a serious limitation: It„s rarely possible to anticipate the design of a completed system before it is implemented. The system must be restructured as it grows.
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This note was uploaded on 02/28/2012 for the course CSC 337 taught by Professor Johnson during the Fall '11 term at University of Arizona- Tucson.

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2-Introduction - Object-Oriented Programming and Design Thienne Johnson Introduction to OOP Agenda Historical perspective Object Model and

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