Introduction to Social Psychology

Introduction to Social Psychology - Introduction to Social...

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Introduction to Social Psychology Introduction to Social Psychology Some Orienting Positions of Social Psychology: Some Orienting Positions of Social Psychology: - why do people behave the way they do - personality, learning, stress, contacts of others - social psychology: behavior, feeling, thinking 1. Social Situations affect us powerfully, both through direct effects on behavior and through how we judge others 2. - affect actions and thinking 1. “Social situations” are more powerful determinants of behavior than are “individual dispositions” (personality) 2. - argue that personality doesn’t matter in why you act, think, feel the way you do 1. Social Expectations create Social Reality and Internalized Individual Psychological States 2. - affect how we experience our own reality 1. When explaining or describing the behavior of others, people tend to commit “ The Fundamental Attribution Error,” which is … 2. - the tendency to overestimate the role of personal dispositions and causation of behavior and to underestimate the role of social situation 3. - any kind of label used to describe someone’s behavior 1. A related concept is the Actor/Observer Difference : 1. Observers ( persons explaining the behavior of others ) tend to commit the fundamental attribution error 2. - explain other people’s actions by judging their character 3. - can often describe personality traits that are visible to other people but not to the actor 4. Actors ( persons explaining their own behavior ) commit the error much less frequently, commonly explaining/describing their own behavior as related to situational factors Illustration: The Self-Fulfilling Prophecy Illustration: The Self-Fulfilling Prophecy Figure: 1. 2. 3.
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4. Step 1: Perceiver Impression Formation (Expectations are both actively formed and passively received ) 5. - point of view of somebody else 6. - stereotypes and prejudice - get your impression from the outside world (passive) - make the impression your own (active) 7. Step 2: Perceiver Behaves Consistently with Expectations (perceiver expectations are communicated/expressed , often nonverbally and with minimal, if any, consciousness of so-doing) 8. - start treating other person in ways that satisfy your belief about them 9. - communicate what you think; not necessarily consciously 10. 11. Step 3: Target’s Behavior Adjusts (Unconsciously/reactively) to Perceiver Expectation - act in a way that confirms expectations Robert Rosenthal’s Analysis in the VideoClip on Self-Fulfilling Prophesy in IQ Scores: Robert Rosenthal’s Analysis in the VideoClip on Self-Fulfilling Prophesy in IQ Scores: 1. Brief Review of the experiment: tested everyone in the school; names given to teacher saying that a group of students would become smarter throughout the year 1. IV: expectation that certain students would have an incorrect IQ 1. DV: what happens 1. Results: the students who had been alleged to their teachers that they would get smarter did improve on standardized tests
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This note was uploaded on 02/29/2012 for the course PSYCH 202 taught by Professor Roberts during the Fall '06 term at University of Wisconsin.

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Introduction to Social Psychology - Introduction to Social...

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