Bankruptcy Status

Bankruptcy Status - (adjusted periodically for inflation)...

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Bankruptcy statusIn the case of Rousey v. Jacoway, the United States Supreme Court ruled unanimously on April 4, 2005 that under section 522(d)(10)(E) of the United States Bankruptcy Code (11 U.S.C. 522(d)(10)(E)), a debtor in bankruptcy can exempt his or her IRA, up to the amount necessary for retirement, from the bankruptcy estate.[7] The Court indicated that because rights to withdrawals are based on age, IRAs should receive the same protection as other retirement plans. Thirty-four states already had laws effectively allowing an individual to exempt an IRA in bankruptcy, but the Supreme Court decision allows federal protection for IRAs. The Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2005 expanded the protection for IRAs. Certain IRAs (rollovers from SEP or Simple IRAs, ROTH IRAs, individual IRAs) are exempt up to at least $1,000,000
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Unformatted text preview: (adjusted periodically for inflation) without having to show necessity for retirement.[8] The law provides that "such amount may be increased if the interests of justice so require."[9] Other IRAs (rollovers from most employer sponsored retirement plans (401(k)s, etc.) and non-rollover SEP and SIMPLE IRAs) are entirely exempt.[10] The 2005 BAPCPA also increased the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation insurance limit for IRA deposits at banks. If an IRA engages in a "prohibited transaction," the assets in the IRA will no longer qualify for bankruptcy protection, according to one Federal Circuit Court of Appeals. See Willis v. Menotte, 11th Circuit Court of Appeals, 2011....
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This note was uploaded on 02/29/2012 for the course ECON 4223 taught by Professor Johnp.willen during the Spring '12 term at UCLA.

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