EESA01 Lecture 1-2011-condensed

EESA01 Lecture 1-2011-condensed - Welcome
to
EESA01


Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Welcome
to
EESA01
 Introduc3on
to
Environmental
 Science
 Professor
C.
Mitchell
 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 1
 My
Contact
Informa3on
 Professor
Carl
Mitchell
 Office:
SY‐362
(Science
Research
Building;
TAKE
 THE
ELEVATOR!)
 Email:[email protected] Office
Hours:
Wednesdays,
11:30am‐1:30
pm
 and
by
appointment.
 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 2
 Prof.
Mitchell’s
Qualifica3ons
 •  About
me.
 •  Principal
research
interests:
hydrology,
 biogeochemistry,
mercury
pollu3on,
 stable
isotope
tracers,
wetlands,
land‐use
 change,
climate
change
impacts.
 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 3
 Today’s
Objec3ves
 1.  2.  3.  4.  Organiza3on
of
course
and
ground
rules.
 How
does
science
work?
 What
is
Environmental
Science?

 What
are
the
major
philosophical
points
 surrounding
Environmental
Science?

 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 4
 Textbook
 Required
reading
for
this
course
is:

 “Environment:
The
Science
Behind
the
 Stories,
Canadian
Edi8on”

 Available
in
bookstore;
a
few
copies
 available
in
course
reserves
in
 library.


 There
are
similar
books
out
there,
but
 ONLY
use
this
one.

It
is
the
only
 CANADIAN
version.
 Assigned
reading
laid
out
in
syllabus.
 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 5
 AccessAbility
 •  •  •  •  Students
with
diverse
learning
styles
and
needs
are
 welcome
in
this
course.
 If
you
have
a
disability
or
health
considera3on
that
may
 require
accommoda3ons,
please
approach
me
directly
 and/or
the
AccessAbility
Services
Office
as
soon
as
 possible.
 All
enquiries
are
confiden3al.
 AccessAbility
Services
Office:

 –  –  –  Located
in
room
S302
 (416)
287‐7560
 [email protected] [email protected] 6
 All
Course
Materials
can
be
found
 on
Blackboard
(Internet)
 Go
to:
hlp://portal.utoronto.ca
 You
will
only
have
access
to
Blackboard
if
 you
are
properly
registered
for
this
 course,
have
paid
all
your
fees,
and
have
 a
proper
UTORid.

 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 7
 Breakdown
of
Marks
in
EESA01
 5
assignments
worth
6%
each:
30%
of
final
 mark.

 Mid‐Term:
25%
of
final
mark.

 Final
Exam:
45%
of
final
mark.
 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 8
 Tutorials
and
Assignments
 With
the
excep3on
of
this
week
and
the
week
of
Thanksgiving,
mandatory
 tutorials
are
approximately
every
other
week
(details
in
syllabus).

 Tutorials
in
weeks
opposite
the
mandatory
ones
are
treated
like
“drop‐in
 centres”
for
extra
help
on
the
assigned
material.

 You
will
learn
a
new
skill
during
one
week
of
tutorials
and
then
be
given
an
 assignment
that
is
due
a
lille
over
one
week
later.


 Due
Dates:
Assignments
are
due
EXACTLY
eight
(8)
days
following
the
tutorial
 wherein
the
assignment
was
originally
introduced
(i.e.,
one
day
arer
the
 op3onal
“drop‐in
centre”
visit)
by
4
pm.

All
assignments
are
due
in
the
 labeled
drop‐off
boxes
located
on
the
6th
floor
of
SW.

There
is
a
small
 excep8on
for
assignment
#2,
which
is
due
15
days
following,
dueto
the
 Thanksgiving
holiday.


 Late
Assignments:

NO
SUCH
THING
–
ALL
LATE
ASSIGNMENTS
RECEIVE
A
 MARK
OF
ZERO.


 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 9
 Tutorials
 Ass’ts
due

 this
week!
 •  Tutorials
follow
the
above
schedule.

 Weeks
following
these
scheduled
 tutorials
are
the
“drop
in”
tutorials
for
 extra
help
on
your
assignments.
 •  Distribu3on
of
assignment
materials
will
 take
place
through
BlackBoard
prior
to
 tutorials.

 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 10
 Mid‐Term
Test
 •  The
mid‐term
test
will
be
scheduled
by
 the
Registrar’s
Office
during
the
“Mid‐ Term
Period”;
generally
mid‐late
October.

 •  The
mid‐term
is
worth
25%
of
your
final
 grade.


 •  You
MUST
have
proper
documenta3on
 for
missing
a
mid‐term
or
you
will
get
a
 ZERO.

 •  If
you
have
proper
documenta3on,
the
 weigh3ng
will
go
to
your
final
exam.

 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 11
 Role
of
EESA01
in
Env.
Sci.
Program
 •  EESA01
is
a
required
course
for
most
 programs
in
Environmental
Science
at
UTSC,
 as
well
as
for
IDS.


 •  The
primary
purpose
of
the
course
is
to
 provide
a
scien3fically
rigorous
introduc3on
 to
the
program.

 •  If
you
have
any
interest
in
con3nuing
studies
 in
Environmental
Science,
you’re
in
the
right
 place.

If
this
is
an
elec3ve
for
you,
welcome,
 but
be
forewarned
that
there
are
“easier”
 1st‐year
EES
courses
available.
 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 12
 Rules
 Number
One:

 I
would
really
love:

 •  You
to
show
up
on
3me.
 •  To
have
your
alen3on.
$
 •  Your
full
par3cipa3on.
 •  You
to
do
so
well
you
get
 an
A+.
 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 13
 Number
Two:
 •  Mutual
respect
for
8me:

I
fully
understand
the
stress
and
anxiety
 that
can
be
felt
by
students,
par3cularly
first‐year
students
and
will
 do
my
best
to
NOT
be
the
person
that
holds
up
your
progress
in
 this
course.

Conversely,
it
is
very
important
that
everyone
realize
 that
certain
rules
need
to
be
followed
so
that
my
job
does
not
 become
“email
checker”.


 •  Email:
Number
of
students
I
teach
in
the
fall
term:

600!!!

I
only
 check
email
related
to
this
class
once
per
week.

I
respond
to
 EESA01
email
on
Thursdays
between
4
and
5
pm,
even
when
mid‐ terms
and
assignment
due
dates
are
approaching.


 •  Blackboard
is
a
beler
way
to
communicate
electronically.

TA’s
will
 check
Blackboard
at
least
every
other
day.
 •  The
BEST
way
to
communicate
is
to
come
to
my
office
hours,
 speak
with
me
arer
class,
or
to
show
up
at
my
office
and
hope
I’m
 there.

 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 14
 Number
Three:
 •  Guidance
on
“what
to
learn”:
Anything
on
 lecture
slides,
anything
in
assigned
chapters
to
 read,
anything
you
learn
in
tutorials,
and
 anything
that
comes
out
of
my
mouth
during
 lecture
is
fair
game
for
tests
and
exams.


 •  I
try
to
use
as
many
pictures
and
“cartoons”
as
I
 can
and
then
simply
talk
about
them
(you’ll
 no3ce
that
today
is
a
bit
of
an
excep3on).

In
 other
words:
simply
using
lecture
notes
from
the
 web
to
study
will
be
a
BAD
idea.

You
need
to
 annotate
these
notes
during
lecture.
 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 15
 Characteris3cs
of
a
Successful
 EESA01
Student
 1.  2.  3.  4.  5.  6.  7.  Alends
all
lectures.

 Completes
assigned
reading
before
coming
to
each
lecture.

 Alends
every
tutorial
and
comes
well‐prepared
to
“drop
in”
 tutorials
with
ques3ons
that
will
help
the
student
successfully
 complete
the
assignment.

 Seeks
help
early
when
she/he
has
a
problem
or
does
not
 understand
something.

 Studies
for
tests
and
mid‐terms
prior
to
the
night
before.

 Treats
full‐3me
educa3on
similarly
to
his/her
“dream”
full‐3me
 job.
 Stays
organized
in
ALL
courses.
 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 16
 QUESTIONS?

 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 17
 The
origins
of
this
course
are
in
Physical
 Science,
not
Social
Science.
 My
objec3ve
in
this
course
is
to
achieve
two
 things:
 I:
To
give
you
a
grasp
of
the
tools
and
informa3on
 you
need
to
make
cri3cal
(and
correct)
 judgements
about
things
of
the
Environment.
 II:
To
develop
in
you
a
more
or
less
acute
 understanding
about
the
shortsighted,
 determinedly
stupid
and
destruc3ve
way
in
 which
“modern”,
“advanced”,
“civilized”
society
 behaves
with
respect
to
the
environment.
 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 18
 How
Does
Science
Work?
 1.  Science
is
CURIOSITY
focused
towards
a
ques3on
 that
scien3fic
methods
can
help
to
inform.
 2.  The
Scien3fic
Method
is
a
set
of
rules
which
 prescribe
how
to
derive
knowledge
of
a
par3cular
 kind
–
cer3fied,
validatable
knowledge.

 3.  Using
the
Scien3fic
Method,
one
cannot
show
that
 a
theory
is
“right”,
only
that
it
is
“not
wrong”.
 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 19
 4.  Any
no3on
of
the
world
(theory)
is
only
 “correct”
(not
wrong)
un3l
scru3ny
reveals
it
to
be
 incomplete.
That
is,
any
theory
is
good
only
un3l
 the
first
piece
of
informa3on
is
gained
which
the
 theory
can’t
accommodate.
(note:
evolu3on;
sun
 at
the
centre
of
the
universe).
 5.  Our
Science‐based
understanding
of
the
universe
is
 constantly
changing
because
of
doubt,
scru3ny
and
 the
acquisi3on
of
new
data
(informa3on).
Doubt
 and
ques3oning
lead
to
beler
understanding.
 6.  There
is
no
Absolute
Truth
in
Science,
but
we
do
 have
Laws:
“A
natural
phenomenon
that
has
been
 proven
to
occur
invariably
whenever
certain
 condi3ons
are
met.”
 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 20
 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 21
 There
are
Mul3ple
Ways
to
Test
 Hypotheses
 Figure
1.8
 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 22
 Example
 A
farmer
outside
of
Newmarket
 no3ces
that
the
pond
on
his
 property
has
an
unusually
high
 amount
of
algae
in
it.
Because
of
 the
algal
growth,
his
calle
will
 not
drink
from
the
pond.
 Formulate
a
hypothesis,
make
a
 predic8on,
and
design
an
 experiment
to
determine
 what’s
going
on?
 Talk
to
your
neighbour
about
this
for
a
few
minutes.
 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 23
 An
Experiment
in
Bonus
Marks
 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 24
 “ Tragedy
of
the
Commons”
 •  Concept
proposed
by
Garrel
Hardin
(Ecologist
 from
UCSB)
in
1968.

 •  Unregulated
exploita3on
leads
to
resource
 deple3on.
 •  Resource
users
are
tempted
to
increase
use
 un3l
the
resource
is
gone.
 •  Is
this
STILL
the
basis
for
ongoing
 environmental
issues?

 •  Can
we
do
anything
about
it?
 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 25
 Rapa
Nui
(Easter
Island)
 •  Pay
close
alen3on
to
 “The
Science
Behind
 the
Story”
on
page
11
 of
your
text.

 •  Downfall
of
a
whole
 civiliza3on
at
least
 par3ally
alributable
to
 “Tragedy
of
the
 Commons”
 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 26
 The
Base
Cause
of
Environmental
 Degrada3on
 My
opinion
(probably
the
same
as
most
 Environmental
Scien3st’s):

 THE
ENVIRONMENTAL
ISSUES
THAT
WE
FACE
 TODAY
ARE
DUE
TO
A
COMBINATION
OF
WORLD
 POPULATION
GROWTH
AND
CONSUMPTION
 (SPECIFICALLY,
ENERGY)
FAR
ABOVE
WHAT
CAN
 EASILY
BE
REPLACED

 AND…
 A
GENERAL
IGNORANCE
TO
RECOGNIZE
THIS.
 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 27
 What
is
Environmental
SCIENCE?
 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 28
 Environmental
Scien3sts
and
 Environmentalists
 •  My
grandmother
always
calls
me
an
 “environmentalist”.

She
is
only
par3ally
 correct.
 •  The
basis
of
science
is
to
NOT
approach
a
 problem
from
a
biased
view
(i.e.,
to
be
 objec3ve).

 •  Many
environmentalists
are
not
objec3ve.

 •  This
does
not
mean
that
environmental
 scien3sts
cannot
be
environmentalists,
just
that
 they
are
not
necessarily
so.

 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 29
 Cornucopians
vs.
Cassandras
 •  Cornucopia:
horn
of
plenty
 –  Human
ingenuity
will
see
us
through
 our
environmental
problems
via
new
 technologies
and
the
such.
 •  Cassandra:
mythical
princess
of
 Troy
who
prophesized
about
dire
 future
scenarios 

 –  All
is
lost
because
of
our
impact
on
the
 environment.
 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 30
 Examples
of
Prac3cal
Solu3ons
 •  •  •  •  Scrubbers
on
smokestacks.
($$)
 Recycling
($$)
 Renewable
energy
(i.e.,
solar
and
wind)
($$)
 Best
management
prac3ces
in
natural
resource
 extrac3on
and
agriculture.

($$)
 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 31
 Sustainable
Development
 “Development
(i.e.,
economic
advancement
 through
the
use
of
natural
resources)
that
 meets
the
needs
of
the
present
without
 sacrificing
the
ability
of
future
genera3ons
to
 meet
their
needs.”
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Brundtland
Commission
 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 32
 Social
Impacts
Must
be
Considered
 When the rich get richer and the poor get poorer, both groups suffer. As a consequence of the polarization of wealth and opportunity, the environment is degraded, thereby impoverishing everyone for ever. Through (1) limiting our current environmental, while still promoting (2) economic well-being and (3) social equity, we have a chance at an environmental future. It is quite literally up to people, such as yourselves, to figure out how we’re going to do this. Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 33
 Is
All
Lost?
 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 34
 Next
Lecture
 •  Human
popula3on
and
the
environment
will
be
 the
focus
of
the
next
lecture
 •  We
will
go
through:

 –  The
history
of
human
popula3on
 –  Demographics
 –  The
effect
of
demographics
and
gross
 popula3on
numbers
on
environmental
 degrada3on
 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 35
 Readings
 •  •  •  •  To
catch
up
on
today’s
lecture,
read
Chapter
1,
pages
 1‐30.


 The
final
4
or
5
pages
of
each
chapter
are
exercises
for
 you
to
prac3ce
what
you
may
have
learned.

Take
 advantage
of
having
them.

This
is
the
type
of
thing
 from
which
I
glean
lots
of
my
test
and
exam
ques3ons.


 For
next
class:
Chapter
6,
pages
160‐187.


 For
“keeners”,
chapters
to
be
covered
throughout
the
 course
(not
necessarily
in
this
order):
1‐9,
11,
13‐17.


 Lecture
1
–
Introduc3on
to
Environmental
Science
 36
 ...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 02/29/2012 for the course ENVIRONMEN eesa01 taught by Professor Mitchel during the Fall '11 term at University of Toronto.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online