eesa01 assignment #5-2011 - EESA01 ASSIGNMENT #5 This...

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Unformatted text preview: EESA01 ASSIGNMENT #5 This assignment makes use of two rather large “datasets”, one with daily temperatures from a forest in Minnesota between 1961 and 2005 (MEF temp data-longer.xls) and one with monthly CO2 concentrations at the Mauna Loa site in Hawaii between 1961 and 2005 (mauna loa CO2-monthly-scripps.xls). Both datasets are available on Blackboard. As Environmental Scientists, it is important that you become comfortable working with such large datasets in computer programs such as Microsoft Excel. If you are not comfortable working with the Excel program, your TA’s are there to help you; please go to tutorial. These datasets are far too large for you to “fake” your way through them. With a couple of common skills, you will be able to work with these large datasets easily and quickly. It is a skill you will appreciate both as you continue in your university education and within the workforce in many fields. 60 TOTAL MARKS. What to hand in: 1. In the normal drop box, hand in a paper copy of all your answers to the questions in this assignment (typed and double-spaced), including embedded graphs where this is asked for. DO NOT hand in reams of paper with your excel spreadsheet data. 2. Also prior to the due date/time, email your TA a copy of your excel spreadsheets (as a .xls file only; absolutely no .xlsx files). We are asking this to ensure that you do your own work. We will be checking authorship and time stamp data associated with your files to ensure you did your own work. 
 A.
Dependent
and
Independent
Variables
(6
Marks):
 In
each
of
the
following
lists
of
related
variables,
note
which
is
the
independent
 variable
and
which
is
the
dependent
variable
(2
marks
each):
 1. Temperature:
______________________________
 
 Time:
_______________________________________
 2. Fertilizer
production
per
year:
__________________________________
 
 Nitrogen
content
in
Lake
Ontario:
______________________________
 3. Final
mark
in
EESA01:
___________________________________
 
 #
of
hours
spent
studying:
______________________________
 B.

Providing
Summary
Statistics
of
Large
Datasets
(17
marks):

 Download
the
MEF temp data-longer.xls
file
from
Blackboard.

This
file
contains
 DAILY
average
temperature
data
from
January
1,
1961
through
December
31,
2005
 (16,439
lines
of
data).

Using
this
dataset,
answer
the
following
questions:

 
 1
 1. What
is
the
mean
daily
temperature
for
the
entire
dataset?

What
is
the
range
 in
average
daily
temperatures
for
the
entire
dataset?

(3
marks)
 2. Calculate
the
mean
daily
temperature
in
degrees
Kelvin
for
every
year
in
the
 dataset
(each
of
the
45
years).

What
is
the
range
in
this
data?

(2
marks)
 3. Make
a
graph
plotting
annual
mean
daily
temperatures
(from
question
B2)
 over
time.

Add
a
linear
line
of
best
fit
(trendline)
to
your
data.

Include
an
 equation
for
your
trendline,
as
well
as
its
coefficient
of
variation.

Make
sure
 to
properly
label
your
graph.

(8
marks)
 4. Interpret
your
graph
from
question
B3
above.

What’s
going
on?

At
what
 rate?

How
confident
are
you
in
this
interpretation?


(4
marks)
 C.

Relating
Variables
to
One
Another
(32
marks):

 Download
the
mauna loa CO2-monthly-scripps.xls
file
from
Blackboard.

This
file
 contains
MONTHLY
average
carbon
dioxide
concentration
data
from
January
1961
 through
December
2005
(540
lines
of
data).

Using
this
dataset,
answer
the
 following
questions:

 1. What
is
the
median
monthly
carbon
dioxide
concentration
for
the
entire
 dataset?

What
is
the
range
in
monthly
carbon
dioxide
concentrations
for
the
 entire
dataset?

(3
marks)
 2. Calculate
the
mean
carbon
dioxide
concentration
for
every
year
in
the
 dataset,
using
the
monthly
data.

What
is
the
range
in
this
data?

(2
marks)
 3. Make
a
graph
plotting
monthly
mean
carbon
dioxide
concentration
(from
 question
C2)
over
time.

Add
a
line
of
best
fit
(choose
the
most
appropriate
 “type”)
to
your
data.

Include
an
equation
for
your
trendline,
as
well
as
its
 coefficient
of
variation.

Make
sure
to
properly
label
your
graph.

(8
marks)
 4. Interpret
your
graph
from
question
C3
above.

What’s
going
on?

At
what
 rate?

Why
the
monthly
variation?

How
confident
are
you
in
this
 interpretation?


(6
marks)
 5. Make
another
graph
which
plots
the
relationship
between
the
annual
values
 you
calculated
in
question
B2
with
the
annual
values
you
calculated
in
 question
C2.

Add
a
linear
line
of
best
fit
to
your
data.

Include
an
equation
for
 your
trendline,
as
well
as
its
coefficient
of
variation.

Make
sure
to
properly
 label
your
graph.

(8
marks)
 6. Interpret
your
graph
from
question
C5
above.

How
confident
are
you
in
the
 “causation”
between
these
two
variables?

(5
marks)
 
 Attendance
at
Introductory
Tutorial
for
Assignment
#5
(5
marks)
 
 2
 ...
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This note was uploaded on 02/29/2012 for the course ENVIRONMEN eesa01 taught by Professor Mitchel during the Fall '11 term at University of Toronto- Toronto.

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