2d - 2-D CollisionsWe now need to turn our attention...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: 2-D CollisionsWe now need to turn our attention towards questions involving objects that collide in two dimensions. In the previous section we were looking at only linear collisions, which are quite a bit simpler (mathematically) to handle.Now we need to figure out some ways to handle calculations in more than one dimension. You actually learned about this in Physics 20 in the vectors section. First, lets look at drawing some diagrams of some common collisions, then well worry about the calculations Example 1: Sketcha diagram that represents the collision between two moving pool balls (of equal mass) that strike each other with an angle of 30between them. They do not stick together.We need to show what happens before and after the collision.So far this is just a rough sketch, since we werent told anything about their velocities or the angle that they traveled away at. All that were doing at this point is showing that we know that the balls should move off in directions similar to the ones shown here. Example 2: Sketcha diagram that represents the collision between a moving pool ball that strikes a stationary pool ball. They move off with an angle of 60between them.2/7/2007 studyphysics.caPage 1 of 6AfterBefore30oAfterBefore60oNow we need to start doing some calculations. Some people are more comfortable doing these questions using components, others like using cosine and sine laws.For now we will look at solutions using components. Example 3: A 1.20 kg red ball moving to the right at 17.1m/s strikes a stationary 2.31 kg blue ball. If the final velocity of the red ball is 13.5m/s at 23.0above the horizontal, determinethe final velocity of the blueball. A sketch is always a good idea, even if you're not asked for one......
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 02/29/2012 for the course PHYS 227 taught by Professor Rabe during the Fall '08 term at Rutgers.

Page1 / 6

2d - 2-D CollisionsWe now need to turn our attention...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online