Ch0102 - Chapter 2 Conservation of Mechanical Energy I:...

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Chapter 2 Conservation of Mechanical Energy I: Kinetic Energy & Gravitational Potential Energy 10 2 Conservation of Mechanical Energy I: Kinetic Energy & Gravitational Potential Energy Physics professors often assign conservation of energy problems that, in terms of mathematical complexity, are very easy, to make sure that students can demonstrate that they know what is going on and can reason through the problem in a correct manner, without having to spend much time on the mathematics. A good before-and-after-picture correctly depicting the configuration and state of motion at each of two well-chosen instants in time is crucial in showing the appropriate understanding. A presentation of the remainder of the conceptual- plus-mathematical solution of the problem starting with a statement in equation form that the energy in the before picture is equal to the energy in the after picture, continuing through to an analytical solution and, if numerical values are provided, only after the analytical solution has been arrived at, substituting values with units, evaluating, and recording the result is almost as important as the picture. The problem is that, at this stage of the course, students often think that it is the final answer that matters rather than the communication of the reasoning that leads to the answer. Furthermore, the chosen problems are often so easy that students can arrive at the correct final answer without fully understanding or communicating the reasoning that leads to it. Students are unpleasantly surprised to find that correct final answers earn little to no credit in the absence of a good correct before-and- after picture and a well-written remainder of the solution that starts from first principles, is consistent with the before and after picture, and leads logically, with no steps omitted, to the correct answer. Note that students who focus on correctly communicating the entire solution, on their own, on every homework problem they do, stand a much better chance of successfully doing so on a test than those that “just try to get the right numerical answer” on homework problems. Mechanical Energy Energy is a transferable physical quantity that an object can be said to have. If one transfers energy to a material particle that is initially at rest, the speed of that particle changes to a value which is an indicator of how much energy was transferred. Energy has units of joules, abbreviated J. Energy can’t be measured directly but when energy is transferred to or from an object, some measurable characteristic (or characteristics) of that object changes (change) such that, measured values of that characteristic or those characteristics (in combination with one or more characteristics such as mass that do not change by any measurable amount) can be used to determine how much energy was transferred. Energy is often categorized according to which measurable characteristic changes when energy is transferred. In other words, we categorize
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Ch0102 - Chapter 2 Conservation of Mechanical Energy I:...

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