Ch0104 - Chapter 4 Conservation of Momentum 4 Conservation...

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Chapter 4 Conservation of Momentum 20 4 Conservation of Momentum A common mistake involving conservation of momentum crops up in the case of totally inelastic collisions of two objects, the kind of collision in which the two colliding objects stick together and move off as one. The mistake is to use conservation of mechanical energy rather than conservation of momentum. One way to recognize that some mechanical energy is converted to other forms is to imagine a spring to be in between the two colliding objects such that the objects compress the spring. Then imagine that, just when the spring is at maximum compression, the two objects become latched together. The two objects move off together as one as in the case of a typical totally inelastic collision. After the collision, there is energy stored in the compressed spring so it is clear that the total kinetic energy of the latched pair is less than the total kinetic energy of the pair prior to the collision. There is no spring in a typical inelastic collision. The mechanical energy that would be stored in the spring, if there was one, results in permanent deformation and a temperature increase of the objects involved in the collision. The momentum of an object is a measure of how hard it is to stop that object. The momentum of an object depends on both its mass and its velocity. Consider two objects of the same mass , e.g. two baseballs. One of them is coming at you at 10 mph, and the other at 100 mph. Which one has the greater momentum? Answer: The faster baseball is, of course, harder to stop, so it has the greater momentum. Now consider two objects of different mass with the same velocity , e.g. a Ping-Pong ball and a cannon ball, both coming at you at 25 mph. Which one has the greater momentum? The cannon ball is, of course, harder to stop, so it has the greater momentum. The momentum p of an object is equal to the product 1 of the object’s mass m and velocity v : m p = (4-1) Momentum has direction. Its direction is the same as that of the velocity. In this chapter we will limit ourselves to motion along a line (motion in one dimension). Then there are only two directions, forward and backward. An object moving forward has a positive velocity/momentum and one moving backward has a negative velocity/momentum. In solving physics problems, the decision as to which way is forward is typically left to the problem solver. Once the problem solver decides which direction is the positive direction, she must state what her choice is (this statement, often made by means of notation in a sketch, is an important part of the solution), and stick with it throughout the problem. The concept of momentum is important in physics because the total momentum of any system
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This note was uploaded on 02/29/2012 for the course PHYS 227 taught by Professor Rabe during the Fall '08 term at Rutgers.

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Ch0104 - Chapter 4 Conservation of Momentum 4 Conservation...

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