Ch0118 - Chapter 18 Circular Motion: Centripetal...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 18 Circular Motion: Centripetal Acceleration 111 18 Circular Motion: Centripetal Acceleration There is a tendency to believe that if an object is moving at constant speed then it has no acceleration. This is indeed true in the case of an object moving along a straight line path. On the other hand, a particle moving on a curved path is accelerating whether the speed is changing or not. Velocity has both magnitude and direction. In the case of a particle moving on a curved path, the direction of the velocity is continually changing, and thus the particle has acceleration. We now turn our attention to the case of an object moving in a circle. Well start with the simplest case of circular motion, the case in which the speed of the object is a constant, a case referred to as uniform circular motion. For the moment, lets have you be the object. Imagine that you are in a car that is traveling counterclockwise, at say 40 mph, as viewed from above, around a fairly small circular track. You are traveling in a circle. Your velocity is not constant. The magnitude of your velocity is not changing (constant speed), but the direction of your velocity is continually changing, you keep turning left! Now if you are continually turning left then you must be continually acquiring some leftward velocity. In fact, your acceleration has to be exactly leftward, at right angles to your velocity because, if your speed is not changing, but your velocity is continually changing, meaning you have some acceleration dt d v h h = a , then for every infinitesimal change in clock reading dt , the change in velocity v h d that occurs during that infinitesimal time interval must be perpendicular to the velocity itself. (If it wasnt perpendicular, then the speed would be increasing or decreasing.) So no matter where you are in the circle (around which you are traveling counterclockwise as viewed from above) you have an acceleration directed exactly leftward, perpendicular to the direction of your velocity. Now what is always directly leftward of you if you are traveling counterclockwise around a circle? Precisely! The center of the circle is always directly leftward of you. Your acceleration is thus, always, center directed. We call the center-directed acceleration associated with circular motion centripetal acceleration because the word centripetal means center-directed. Note that if you are traveling around the circle clockwise as viewed from above, you are continually turning right and your acceleration is directed rightward, straight toward the center of the circle. These considerations apply to any objectan object moving in a circle has centripetal (center-directed) acceleration....
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Ch0118 - Chapter 18 Circular Motion: Centripetal...

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