Ch0119 - Chapter 19 Rotational Motion Variables, Tangential...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 19 Rotational Motion Variables, Tangential Acceleration, Constant Angular Acceleration 117 19 Rotational Motion Variables, Tangential Acceleration, Constant Angular Acceleration Because so much of the effort that we devote to dealing with angles involves acute angles, when we go to the opposite extreme, e.g. to angles of thousands of degrees, as we often do in the case of objects spinning with a constant angular acceleration, one of the most common mistakes we humans tend to make is simply not to recognize that when someone asks us; starting from time zero, how many revolutions, or equivalently how many turns or rotations an object makes; that someone is asking for the value of the angular displacement . To be sure, we typically calculate in radians, so we have to convert the result to revolutions before reporting the final answer, but the number of revolutions is simply the value of . In the last chapter we found that a particle in uniform circular motion has centripetal acceleration given by equations 18-5 and 18-6: r v 2 c = a 2 c w r = a It is important to note that any particle undergoing circular motion has centripetal acceleration, not just those in uniform (constant speed) circular motion. If the speed of the particle (the value of v in r v 2 c = a ) is changing, then the value of the centripetal acceleration is clearly changing. One can still calculate it at any instant at which one knows the speed of the particle. If, besides the acceleration that the particle has just because it is moving in a circle, the speed of the particle is changing, then the particle also has some acceleration directed along (or in the exact opposite direction to) the velocity of the particle. Since the velocity is always tangent to the circle on which the particle is moving, this component of the acceleration is referred to as the tangential acceleration of the particle. The magnitude of the tangential acceleration of a particle in circular motion is simply the absolute value of the rate of change of the speed of the particle dt d a v = t . The direction of the tangential acceleration is the same as that of the velocity if the particle is speeding up, and in the direction opposite that of the velocity if the particle is slowing down. Recall that, starting with our equation relating the position s of the particle along the circle to the angular position of a particle, r = s , we took the derivative with respect to time to get the relation w r v = . If we take a second derivative with respect to time we get dt d dt d w r v = Chapter 19 Rotational Motion Variables, Tangential Acceleration, Constant Angular Acceleration 118 On the left we have the tangential acceleration t a of the particle. The dt d w on the right is the time rate of change of the angular velocity of the object. The angular velocity is the spin rate, so a non-zero value of dt d w means that the imaginary line segment that extends from the center of the circle to the particle is spinning faster or slower as time goes by. the circle to the particle is spinning faster or slower as time goes by....
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This note was uploaded on 02/29/2012 for the course PHYS 227 taught by Professor Rabe during the Fall '08 term at Rutgers.

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Ch0119 - Chapter 19 Rotational Motion Variables, Tangential...

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