Ch0226 - Chapter 26 Geometric Optics Reflection 26...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 26 Geometric Optics, Reflection 229 26 Geometric Optics, Reflection We now turn to a branch of optics referred to as geometric optics and also referred to as ray optics. It applies in cases where the dimensions of the objects (and apertures) with which the light interacts are so large as to render diffraction effects negligible. In geometric optics we treat light as being made up of an infinite set of narrow beams of light, called light rays , or simply rays, traveling through vacuum or transparent media along straight line paths. Where a ray of light encounters the surface of a mirror, or the interface between the transparent medium in which it (the light) is traveling and another transparent medium, the ray makes an abrupt change in direction, after which, it travels along a new straight line path. In the geometric optics model of light, we see light emitted by sources of light because the light enters our eyes. Consider for instance, a candle. Every point of the flame of the candle emits rays of light in every direction. While the preceding diagram conveys the idea in the statement preceding the diagram, the diagram is not the complete picture. To get a more complete picture of what’s going on, what I want you to do is to look at the diagram provided, form a picture of it in your mind, and, to the picture in your mind, add the following embellishments:
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 26 Geometric Optics, Reflection 230 1. First off, I need you to imagine it to be a real candle extending in three dimensions . Our set of rays depicted as arrows whose tips are all on a circle becomes a set of rays depicted as arrows whose tips all end on a sphere . Thus, in addition to rays going (at various angles) upward, downward and to the sides, you’ve got rays proceeding (at various angles) away from you and toward you. 2. Now I need you to add more rays to the picture in your mind. I included 16 rays in the diagram. In three dimensions, you should have about 120 rays in the picture in your mind. I need you to bump that up to infinity. 3. In the original diagram, I showed rays coming only from the tip of the flame. At this point, we have an infinite number of rays coming from the tip of the flame. I need you to picture that to be the case for each point of the flame, not just the tip of the flame. In the interest of simplicity, in the picture in your mind, let the flame of the candle be an opaque solid rather than gaseous, so that we can treat all our rays as coming from points on the surface of the flame. Neglect any rays that are in any way directed into the flame itself (don’t include them in the picture in your mind). Upon completion of this step, you should have, in the picture in your mind, an infinite number of rays coming from each of the infinite number of points making up the surface of the flame.
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern