Halflife - Note-A-Rific: Half Life With all these nuclei...

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Note-A-Rific: Half Life With all these nuclei decaying, you’d think eventually you’d run out of parent atoms. That’s exactly what happens! (at least in an isolated sample of an element) If you have a bunch of atoms they will randomly decay. We don’t know when a particular nucleus will decay, but we can figure out the probability that it will decay. The “Half Life” of an element is the time it will take half of the parent atoms to transmutate into something else. This value varies from 10 -22 s to 10 28 s ( 10 21 years!) Example: The half life of is 5730 years. ! If a piece of wood originally had 100 of these Carbon -14 atoms, after 5730 years it would only have 50 (the others have transmutated into other elements). ! After another 5730 years (total of 11 460 years), there would only be 25 Carbon-14 atoms left. ! After another 5730 years (total 17 190 years), there would only be 12 or 13 atoms left. ! Notice each time we divide the number of atoms by two. The number of nuclei that decay per second is called the decay rate or activity of the sample. The decay rate is usually measured in Becquerels (Bq) which is equal to
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Halflife - Note-A-Rific: Half Life With all these nuclei...

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