Heisenberg

Heisenberg - Note-A-Rific: Heisenberg Any measurement has a...

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Note-A-Rific: Heisenberg Any measurement has a some degree of uncertainty. Around the time all this quantum stuff was becoming more popular, some physicists started to ask the question “Will this always be true?” They were looking ahead to a time when advances in science could reduce the error in measurements to the point that a person could say exactly what are an object’s measurements. If we use more and more precise instruments, couldn’t we make that error infinitely small? Nope! ” says Werner Heisenberg (I’ve always liked this guy’s name for some reason…). It’s not something wrong with the instrument, but the universe itself that limits how accurate a measurement can be. There is always some interaction between the instrument used and the measured object. It is impossible to exactly measure an object. To understand Heisenberg’s idea, look at his evidence: To “see” an object, at least one photon of light must hit it and bounce back to our
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This note was uploaded on 02/29/2012 for the course PHYS 227 taught by Professor Rabe during the Fall '08 term at Rutgers.

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Heisenberg - Note-A-Rific: Heisenberg Any measurement has a...

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