lab04 - LAB 4 VECTORS CONCURRENT FORCES INTRODUCTION...

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LAB # 4 VECTORS- CONCURRENT FORCES INTRODUCTION : Measurable quantities, as found in nature, may be classified as: (a) scalar quantities, which have magnitude only, and (b) vector quantities, which have both magnitude and direction. Thus, in the measurement of a force, it is necessary to know both the magnitude of the force and the direction in which it acts. For example; Determination of the mass of a body is a scalar measurement since no direction can be assigned to a mass. Weight, however, which is the force exerted by the earth on a mass, has a particular direction and is therefore a vector. Scalar quantities are added arithmetically, but when vectors are added, both magnitudes and directions must be considered. The resultant (or vector sum) of a set of forces is that single force which will produce the same effect as the whole set of forces. This sum can be obtained graphically, analytically and experimentally. In discussing force vectors it is convenient to define two terms: 1. The Resultant of 2 or more force vectors; another word for their vector sum. It represents the single vector that could replace them. 2. The Equilibrant of a set of force vectors is the negative of the resultant. It represents the single vector that would nullify the action of the other, producing a static force of equilibrium. APPARATUS : Force table with pulleys, weights and weight holders, ruler and protractor, small level, Computer and -Graphic Analysis. PROCEDURE:
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This note was uploaded on 02/29/2012 for the course PHYS 227 taught by Professor Rabe during the Fall '08 term at Rutgers.

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lab04 - LAB 4 VECTORS CONCURRENT FORCES INTRODUCTION...

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