lab07 - LAB # 7 The Coefficient of Friction Introduction:...

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LAB # 7 The Coefficient of Friction Introduction: We will measure the coefficient of kinetic friction for a wood block sliding on an inclined plane. We will demonstrate that the friction force is independent of the area of contact between the block and the plane and that the force is proportional to the normal force acting on the block. Friction forces arise whenever objects with surfaces in contact move relative to one another. These forces are actually electromagnetic in nature, arising from the electrostatic repulsion of small irregularities in the surfaces. The two distinct cases of frictional force are: Static and Kinetic In the static case, the objects are at rest relative to one another but subject to a sideways (shear) force. The shear force can increase from zero up to some maximum value called F s max before any motion occurs. Since the shear force may vary but the objects do not accelerate relative to one another as long as the sheer is less than F s max, the friction force must also vary in order to satisfy Newton's Second Law. The value of F
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This note was uploaded on 02/29/2012 for the course PHYS 227 taught by Professor Rabe during the Fall '08 term at Rutgers.

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lab07 - LAB # 7 The Coefficient of Friction Introduction:...

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