Work - Work The everyday definition of work and the one that we use in physics are quite different from each other When most people think about

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Work The everyday definition of “work” and the one that we use in physics are quite different from each other. When most people think about “work” they think of the job that they have. In physics we use two very exact definitions of work. Definition 1: Work is a transfer of energy Definition 2: Work is a force causing an object to have a displacement. Both of these definitions can be seen in the formula on your data sheet: W = ΔE = Fd Notice that both of the definitions are shown in the formula. A transfer of energy means a change in energy ( ΔE ) is happening. It also shows that a force and displacement are happening. Most of the time you don't even have to use the formula this way. You'll also see it on your data sheet as: W = F d W = work (Joules) F = force (Newtons) d = displacement (metres) By definition, 1 J of work is done by applying 1 N of force to move an object 1 m. Work has no direction, so it is a scalar quantity. But, the direction of motion must be in the same direction ( parallel ) as the direction of the force, otherwise no work is being done. Example 1 : I am holding a 2 kg block of cheese in my hands. I walk 12 m to the other side of the room. Explain if I did any work. Since I am holding the cheese
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This note was uploaded on 02/29/2012 for the course PHYS 227 taught by Professor Rabe during the Fall '08 term at Rutgers.

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Work - Work The everyday definition of work and the one that we use in physics are quite different from each other When most people think about

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