occu 2 - Nautical Folklore Blood Magic : In some parts of...

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Nautical Folklore Blood Magic : In some parts of the West Indies, at least until recently, it was common to use animal blood to christen a fishing boat. Most of the Western World however is satisfied with Champagne. Born Unlucky: If the bottle fails to break during the christening of a ship. Don't set out on Friday. Don't set out on Thursday, either: That is Thor's day and you don't want to offend the guy in charge of storms. Do not take a murderer, a debtor or a woman aboard: It's bad luck. Don't build a ship out of black walnut, either. No one is sure why not. Just don't. Also don't rename a ship. And never name a ship after a vessel that had bad luck which is why nobody names their ship Titanic ). Due to the Dead: US Midshipmen place coins in the grave of John Paul Jones. Presumably he will reward them with a due share of good grades.
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Hubris : Do not give a merchantman a grandiose name. That is Tempting Fate. Passenger liners and clipper ships were often an exception to this, having names like Lightning , or even Sovereign of the Seas . Warship names, on the other hand, invoke this; many were (and still are) given grandiose and ferocious- sounding names like Victory , Warrior , or even truly fate- tempting ones like Invincible and Indefatigable . I Owe You My Life: According to one story a Mermaid was stranded on a beach and found by a kindly Scottish boat builder. She offered him a wish and his wish was that no boat he ever built would ever sink. According to
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occu 2 - Nautical Folklore Blood Magic : In some parts of...

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