CxVirus - Viruses and Cancer Folder Title CxVirus Updated...

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Viruses and Cancer Folder Title: CxVirus Updated: April 12, 2010 TtlVirus
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Importance of Virology to Cancer Biology and Cancer Medicine Need to Control Potentially Infectious Exposure Development of Prophylactic and Therapeutic Vaccines Learning About Cancer Biology from Viruses: How Do They Do It? VirCxBio
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Infectious Agents in Neoplasia Non-Viral Agents Parasitic Worms - Hepatic Sarcomas and Bladder Cancers in Dogs Crown Gall Tumor in Plants: Agrobacter Tumifaciens Viral Causation Ellerman and Bang Avian Leucosis Virus 1909 Rous Sarcoma Virus in Chickens 1911 Shope Papilloma Virus in Rabbits 1930 Bittner Milk Factor in C3H Mice 1936 Gross Murine Leukemia Virus 1945 Friend Erythroleukemia Virus 1957 Human T-Cell Lymphotrophic Virus (HTLV-1) 1980 (Bernie Poiesz and Robert Gallo) InfectCx
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Why So Hard to Identify Viral Causative Agents in Cancer? Difficult to Infect Outbred Adult Hosts. Virally Transformed Cells Need Not (and usually don't) Shed, bud, otherwise produce, or even show the presence of virus particles Viruses can sometimes be recovered ("rescued") from transformed cells Viruses are exquisitely specific for target species, tissue, and conditions of binding and insertion. Viruses tend to transform host cells other than their normal infectious target. VirusHid
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Carry and directly transfer cancer causing genes by infecting target cells? Be present in the germ line as provirus copies in the host DNA From infection in times past Reactivated by carcinogenic events? Be inserted into the host cell genome and misregulate endogenous host genes? Infect host cells and produce viral proteins that alter host cell genetics and phenotype?
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General Structural Features of Oncogenic Viruses DNA Viruses: DNA Genome Double Stranded Linear Double Stranded Closed Circular Single Stranded RNA Viruses ("Retro-Viruses") RNA Genome Two Copies of Single Stranded RNA Retroviral Genome replication by reverse transcription Makes a DNA "Provirus" Copy DNA and RNA Tumor Viruses: Have Potential to Alter Host DNA Structure or Expression During Viral Infection of the Cell GenVirus
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Structure of DNA Tumor Viruses Naked DNA Tumor Viruses
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CxVirus - Viruses and Cancer Folder Title CxVirus Updated...

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