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Mod2_sem - by cycles of mutual influence Reciprocal...

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Module 2 Health Behavior Theory: Social Ecological Model J. Don Chaney, Ph.D., CHES Assistant Dean for Distance Education and Outreach Assistant Professor of Health Education and Behavior
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What is Social Ecology? Involves intervention at the intrapersonal and interpersonal level Ecology – describes interrelation between organisms and their environment Social Ecology – social, institutional, and cultural contexts of people (environmental relations)
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Core Assumptions of the SE 1) The healthfulness of a situation and the well being of individuals are influenced by multiple facets of the physical and social environments Also personal attributes play a role 2) Human environments are multidimensional and complex Physical vs. Social Objective vs. Subjective Proximal vs. Distal
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Core Assumptions of the SEM 3. Participants and environment can and should be studied at varying levels. Individual, small groups, organizational level, population level 4. People and environment transactions are characterized
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Unformatted text preview: by cycles of mutual influence Reciprocal Determinism The most basic assumption is of the multidimensional nature of health and influences on health status. Social Ecological Model 1. INTRAPERSONAL Individual’s personal attributes Knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, experiences, and values 2. INTERPERSONAL Formal and informal social network and social support systems, including family, workgroup, and friendship networks Social support is conducive to health change Psychosocial assets 3. INSTITUTIONAL FACTORS Social Institutions with organizational characteristics Eg. Schools, churches Corporate culture – employees feel that there is management support in health programs Instruction must be supportive 4. COMMUNITY FACTORS Relationships among organizations, institutions, etc. Linkage 5. PUBLIC POLICY Local, state, and national laws and policies Social Ecological Model...
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