1-22 - Lecture 23 Manifold Hydraulic Design I. Introduction...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture 23 Manifold Hydraulic Design I. Introduction • Manifolds in trickle irrigation systems often have multiple pipe sizes to: 1. reduce pipe costs 2. reduce pressure variations • • • • In small irrigation systems the reduction in pipe cost may not be significant, not to mention that it is also easier to install a system with fewer pipe sizes Manifold design is normally subsequent to lateral design, but it can be part of an iterative process (i.e. design the laterals, design the manifold, adjust the lateral design, etc.) The allowable head variation in the manifold, for manifolds as subunits, is given by the allowable subunit head variation (Eq. 20.14) and the calculated lateral head variation, ∆Hl This simple relationship is given in Eq. 23.1: ( ∆Hm )a = ∆Hs − ∆Hl • • • (437) Eq. 23.1 simply says that the allowable subunit head variation is shared by the laterals and manifold Recall that a starting design point can be to have ∆Hl = ½∆Hs, and ∆Hm = ½∆Hs, but this half and half proportion can be adjusted during the design iterations The lateral pressure variation, ∆Hl, is equal to the maximum pressure minus the minimum pressure, which is true for single-direction laterals and uphill+downhill pairs, if Hn’ is the same both uphill and downhill II. Allowable Head Variation • • • • Equation 20.14 (page 502 in the textbook) gives the allowable pressure head variation in a “subunit” This equation is an approximation of the true allowable head variation, because this equation is applied before the laterals and manifold are designed After designing the laterals and manifold, the actual head variation and expected EU can be recalculated Consider a linear friction loss gradient (no multiple outlets) on flat ground: In this case, the average head is Sprinkle & Trickle Irrigation Lectures Page 253 Merkley & Allen equal to Hn plus half the difference in the maximum and minimum heads: ( H max − H n = 2 H a − H n • ) (438) Consider a sloping friction loss gradient (multiple outlets) on flat ground: In this case, the average head occurs after about ¾ of the total head loss (due to friction) occurs, beginning from the lateral inlet. Then, ( H max − H n = 4 H a − H n • ) For a sloping friction loss gradient (multiple outlets) on flat ground with dual pipe sizes, about 63% of the friction head loss occurs from the lateral inlet to the location of average pressure. Then 100/(100-63) = 2.7 and, ( H max − H n = 2.7 H a − H n • • • • ) (440) In summary, an averaging is performed to skew the coefficient toward the minimum value of 2, recognizing that the maximum is about 4, and that for dual-size laterals (or manifolds), the coefficient might be approximately 2.7 The value of 2.5 used in Eq. 20.14 is such a weighted average With three or four pipe sizes the friction loss gradient in the manifold will approach the slope of the ground, which may be linear Thus, as an initial estimate for determining allowable subunit pressure variation for a given design value of EU, Eq. 20.14 is written as follows: ( ∆Hs = 2.5 H a − H n • (439) ) (441) After the design process, the final value of ∆Hs may be different, but if it is much different the deviation should be somehow justified Merkley & Allen Page 254 Sprinkle & Trickle Irrigation Lectures III. Pipe Sizing in Manifolds • Ideally, a manifold design considers all of the following criteria: 1. economic balance between pipe cost (present) and pumping costs (future) 2. allowable pressure variation in the manifold and subunit 3. pipe flow velocity limits (about 1.5 - 2.0 m/s) • • • • From sprinkler system design, we already know of various pipe sizing methods These methods can also be applied to the design of manifolds However, the difference with trickle manifolds is that instead of one or two pipe sizes, we may be using three or four sizes The manifold design procedures described in the textbook are: 1. Semi-graphical 2. Hydraulic grade line (HGL) 3. Economic pipe sizing (as in Chapter 8 of the textbook) Semi-Graphical Design Procedure • • • • • • The graphical method uses “standard” head loss curves for different pipe sizes and different flow rates with equally-spaced multiple outlets, each outlet with the same discharge The curves all intersect at the origin (corresponding to the downstream closed end of a pipe) Below is a sample of the kind of curves given in Fig. 23.2 of the textbook Instead of the standard curves, specific curves for each design case could be custom developed and plotted as necessary in spreadsheets The steps to complete a graphical design are outlined in the textbook The graphical procedure is helpful in understanding the hydraulic design of multiple pipe size manifolds, but may not be as expedient as fully numerical procedures Sprinkle & Trickle Irrigation Lectures Page 255 Merkley & Allen 3.8 3.6 3.4 3.2 Friction Head Loss (ft) 3.0 2.8 2.6 2.4 2.2 2.0 1.8 1.6 1.4 1.2 1.25 inch 1.50 inch 2.00 inch 2.50 inch 3.00 inch 4.00 inch 1.0 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.0 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200 220 240 260 280 300 320 Flow Rate (gpm ) • The following steps illustrate the graphical design procedure: Step 1: flow direction (∆Hm)a 1 0 manifold flow rate ∆Em So Qm xd Merkley & Allen Page 256 Sprinkle & Trickle Irrigation Lectures Step 2: flow direction (∆Hm)a 1 0 ∆Em So Qm manifold flow rate xd Step 3: flow direction (∆Hm)a 1 0 manifold flow rate ∆Em So Qm xd Sprinkle & Trickle Irrigation Lectures Page 257 Merkley & Allen Step 4: flow direction (∆Hm)a 1 0 ∆Em So Qm manifold flow rate xd Step 5: flow direction (∆Hm)a 1 0 manifold flow rate ∆Em So Qm xd Merkley & Allen Page 258 Sprinkle & Trickle Irrigation Lectures Step 6: flow direction (∆Hm)a 1 0 ∆Em So Qm manifold flow rate xd HGL Design Procedure • • • • • • The HGL procedure is very similar to the graphical procedure, except that it is applied numerically, without the need for graphs Nevertheless, it is useful to graph the resulting hydraulic curves to check for errors or infeasibilities The first (upstream) head loss curve starts from a fixed point: maximum discharge in the manifold and upper limit on head variation Equations for friction loss curves of different pipe diameters are known (e.g. Darcy-Weisbach, Hazen-Williams), and these can be equated to each other to determine intersection points, that is, points at which the pipe size would change in the manifold design But, before equating head loss equations, the curves must be vertically shifted so they just intersect with the ground slope curve (or the tangent to the first, upstream, curve, emanating from the origin) The vertical shifting can be done graphically or numerically Economic Design Procedure • The economic design procedure is essentially the same as that given in Chapter 8 of the textbook Sprinkle & Trickle Irrigation Lectures Page 259 Merkley & Allen • • The manifold has multiple outlets (laterals or headers), and the “section flow rate” changes between each outlet The “system flow rate” would be the flow rate entering the manifold IV. Manifold Inlet Pressure Head • After completing the manifold pipe sizing, the required manifold inlet pressure head can be determined (Eq. 23.4): Hm = Hl + k hf + 0.5∆Em (442) where k = 0.75 for single-diameter manifolds; k = 0.63 for dual pipe size laterals; or k ≈ 0.5 for three or more pipe sizes (tapered manifolds); and ∆El is negative for downward-sloping manifolds • • • As with lateral design, the friction loss curves must be shifted up to provide for the required average pressure In the case of manifolds, we would like the average pressure to be equal to the calculated lateral inlet head, Hl The parameter ∆El is the elevation difference along one portion of the manifold (either uphill or downhill), with positive values for uphill slopes and negative values for downhill slopes V. Manifold Design • • Manifolds should usually extend both ways from the mainline to reduce the system cost, provided that the ground slope in the direction of the manifolds is less than about 3% (same as for laterals, as in the previous lectures) As shown in the sample layout (plan view) below, manifolds are typically orthogonal to the mainline, and laterals are orthogonal to the manifolds Merkley & Allen Page 260 Sprinkle & Trickle Irrigation Lectures • • Manifolds usually are made up of 2 to 4 pipe diameters, tapered (telescoping) down toward the downstream end For tapered manifolds, the smallest of the pipe diameters (at the downstream end) should be greater than about ½ the largest diameter (at the upstream end) to help avoid clogging during flushing of the manifold D1 • • D2 D3>0.5D1 The maximum average flow velocity in each pipe segment should be less than about 2 m/s Water hammer is not much of a concern, primarily because the manifold has multiple outlets (which rapidly attenuates a high- or low-pressure wave), but the friction loss increases exponentially with flow velocity VI. Trickle Mainline Location • • The objective is the same as for pairs of laterals: make (Hn)uphill equal to (Hn)downhill If average friction loss slopes are equal for both uphill and downhill manifold branches (assuming similar diameters will carry similar flow rates): Downhill side: ( ∆Hm )a = hfd − ∆E ⎛ ⎜ x⎞ = hfd − Y∆E L⎟ ⎝⎠ (443) L−x⎞ ⎟ = hfu + (1 − Y)∆E ⎝L⎠ (444) Uphill side: ( ∆Hm )a = hfu + ∆E ⎛ ⎜ where x is the length of downhill manifold (m or ft); L is the total length of the manifold (m or ft); Y equals x/L; and ∆E is the absolute elevation difference of the uphill and downhill portions of the manifold (m or ft) • • Note that in the above, ∆E is an absolute value (always positive) Then, the average uphill and downhill friction loss slopes are equal: Juphill = Jdownhill (445) hfu h = fd L−x x where J-bar is the average friction loss gradient from the mainline to the end of the manifold (J-bar is essentially the same as JF) Sprinkle & Trickle Irrigation Lectures Page 261 Merkley & Allen Then, hf d = J x (446) hfu = J (L − x ) and, then, ( ∆Hm )a = J x − Y∆E ( ∆Hm )a = J (L − x ) + (1 − Y) ∆E ( ∆Hm )a + Y∆E x =J ( ∆Hm )a − (1 − Y) ∆E L−x • (448) =J Equating both J-bar values, ( ∆Hm )a + Y∆E ( ∆Hm )a − (1 − Y) ∆E x • = L−x Y or, • • • (449) Dividing by L and rearranging (to get Eq. 23.3), ( ∆Hm )a + Y∆E ( ∆Hm )a − (1 − Y) ∆E • (447) = 1− Y ∆E 2Y − 1 = ( ∆Hm )a 2Y(1 − Y) (450) (451) Equation 23.3 is used to determine the lengths of the uphill and downhill portions of the manifold You can solve for Y (and x), given ∆E and (∆Hm)a = ∆Hs - ∆Hl Remember that ∆Hs ≈ 2.5(Ha – Hn), where Ha is for the average emitter and Hn is for the desired EU and νs Equation 23.3 can be solved by isolating one of the values for Y on the left hand side, such that: ⎛ 2Y − 1 ⎞ ⎛ ( ∆Hm ) ⎞ a Y = 1− ⎜ ⎟⎜ ⎜ ∆E ⎟ ⎟ ⎜ 2Y ⎟ ⎠ ⎝ ⎠⎝ (452) and assuming an initial value for Y (e.g. Y = 0.6), plugging it into the right side of the equation, then iterating to arrive at a solution Merkley & Allen Page 262 Sprinkle & Trickle Irrigation Lectures • • • Note that 0 ≤ Y ≤ 1, so the solution is already well-bracketed Note that in the trivial case where ∆E = 0, then Y = 0.5 (don’t apply the above equation, just use your intuition!) A numerical method (e.g. Newton-Raphson) can also be used to solve the equation for Y VII. Selection of Manifold Pipe Sizes The selection of manifold pipe sizes is a function of: 1. Economics, where pipe costs are balanced with energy costs 2. Balancing hf, ∆E, and (∆Hm)a to obtain the desired EU 3. Velocity constraints VIII. Manifold Pipe Sizing by Economic Selection Method • • This method is similar to that used for mainlines of sprinkler systems Given the manifold spacing, Sm, and the manifold length, do the following: (a) Construct an economic pipe size table where Qs = Qm (b) Select appropriate pipe diameters and corresponding Q values at locations where the diameters will change (c) Determine the lengths of each diameter of pipe (where the Q in the manifold section equals a breakeven Q from the Economic Pipe Size Table (EPST) ⎛ Qbeg − Qend ⎞ LD = L ⎜ ⎟ Qm ⎝ ⎠ (453) where Qbeg is the flow rate at the beginning of diameter “D” in the EPST (lps or gpm); Qend is the flow rate at the end of diameter “D” in the EPST, which is the breakeven flow rate of the next larger pipe size) (lps or gpm); L is the total length of the manifold (m or ft); and Qm is the manifold inflow rate (lps or gpm). (see Eq. 23.7) (d) Determine the total friction loss along the manifold (see Eq. 23.8a): a a a a FLK ⎛ Q1 Qa − Q1 Q3 − Qa Qa − Q3 ⎞ 2+ 4 2 hf = + ⎜ c+ ⎟ c 100 Qm ⎜ D1 Dc D3 Dc ⎟ 2 4 ⎝ ⎠ (454) where, a= c= b+1 (for the Blasius equation, a = 2.75) 4.75 for the Blasius equation (as seen previously) Sprinkle & Trickle Irrigation Lectures Page 263 Merkley & Allen Q1 = Q2 = Q3 = Q4 = F= Q at the beginning of the smallest pipe diameter Q at the beginning of the next larger pipe diameter Q at the beginning of the third largest pipe diameter in the manifold Q at the beginning of the largest pipe diameter in the manifold multiple outlet pipe loss factor • • L= D= K= K= hf = • • • For the Hazen-Williams equation, F equals 1/(1.852+1) = 0.35 For the Darcy-Weisbach equation, F equals 1/(2+1) = 0.33 the total length of the manifold inside diameter of the pipe 7.89(10)7 for D in mm, Q in lps, and length in m 0.133 for D in inches, Q in gpm, and length in ft friction head loss The above equation is for four pipe sizes; if there are less than four sizes, the extra terms are eliminated from the equation An alternative would be to use Eq. 23.8b (for known pipe lengths), or evaluate the friction loss using a computer program or a spreadsheet to calculate the losses section by section along the manifold Eq. 23.8b is written for manifold design as follows: a a a a a FK Qm−1 ⎛ x1 x a − x1 x 3 − x a x a − x 3 ⎞ 2+ 4 2 hf = + ⎜ c+ ⎟ c 100 La −1 ⎜ D1 Dc D3 Dc ⎟ 2 4 ⎝ ⎠ where, • (455) x1 = length of the smallest pipe size x2 = length of the next smaller pipe size x3 = length of the third largest pipe size x4 = length of the largest pipe size Again, there may be up to four different pipe sizes in the manifold, but in many cases there will be less than four sizes (e) For s ≥ 0 (uphill branch of the manifold), ∆Hm = hf + S xu (456) For s < 0 (downhill branch of the manifold), ⎛ 0.36 ⎞ ∆Hm = hf + S ⎜ 1 − xd n⎟ ⎝ ⎠ Merkley & Allen Page 264 (457) Sprinkle & Trickle Irrigation Lectures where n is the number of different pipe sizes used in the branch; and S is the ground slope in the direction of the manifold (m/m) • The above equation estimates the location of minimum pressure in the downhill part of the manifold (f) if ∆Hm < 1.1 (∆Hm)a, then the pipe sizing is all right. Go to step (g) of this procedure. Otherwise, do one or more of the following eight adjustments: B B B B B B (1) Increase the pipe diameters selected for the manifold • Do this proportionately by reselecting diameters from the EPST using a larger Qs (to increase the energy “penalty” and recompute a new EPST). This will artificially increase the break-even flow rates in the table (chart). The new flow rates to use in re-doing the EPST can be estimated for s > 0 as follows: B • B 1/ b ⎛ ⎞ hf old = Qs ⎜ ⎟ ⎜ ( ∆Hm ) − ∆Em ⎟ a ⎝ ⎠ Qnew s (458) and for s < 0 as: 1/ b Qnew s ⎛ ⎞ ⎜ ⎟ hf old ⎜ ⎟ = Qs ⎛ 0.36 ⎞ ⎟ ⎜ ∆H ⎜ ( m )a − ∆El ⎜ 1 − n ⎟ ⎟ ⎝ ⎠⎠ ⎝ (459) • The above two equations are used to change the flow rates to compute the EPST • The value of Qm remains the same • The elevation change along each manifold (uphill or downhill branches) is ∆El = sL/100 (2) Decrease Sm • This will make the laterals shorter, Qm will decrease, and ∆Hl may decrease • This alternative may or may not help in the design process B B B B B (3) Reduce the target EU • This will increase ∆Hs B Sprinkle & Trickle Irrigation Lectures B B B B Page 265 Merkley & Allen (4) Decrease ∆Hl (use larger pipe sizes) • This will increase the cost of the pipes B B (5) Increase Ha • This will increase ∆Hs • This alternative will cost money and or energy B B B B (6) Reduce the manufacturer’s coefficient of variation • This will require more expensive emitters and raise the system cost (7) Increase the number of emitters per tree (Np) • This will reduce the value of νs B B B B (8) If Ns > 1, increase Ta per station • Try operating two or more stations simultaneously B • B B B Now go back to Step (b) and repeat the process. (g) Compute the manifold inlet head, Hm = Hl + khf + 0.5∆Em where, • • (460) k = 0.75 for a single size of manifold pipe k = 0.63 for two pipe sizes k = 0.50 for three or more sizes For non-critical manifolds, or where ∆Hm < (∆Hm)a, decrease Qs (or just design using another sizing method) in the Economic Pipe Selection Table to dissipate excess head For non-rectangular subunits, adjust F using a shape factor: B B B B B B Fs = 0.38S1.25 + 0.62 f B B (461) where Sf = Qlc/Qla; Qlc is the lateral discharge at the end of the manifold and Qla is the average lateral discharge along the manifold. Then, B B B B B B B B B B ⎛ JL ⎞ hf = Fs F ⎜ ⎟ ⎝ 100 ⎠ (462) IX. Manifold Pipe Sizing by the “HGL” Method • • This is the “Hydraulic Grade Line” method Same as the semi-graphical method, but performed numerically Merkley & Allen Page 266 Sprinkle & Trickle Irrigation Lectures (a) Uphill Side of the Manifold • Get the smallest allowable pipe diameter and use only the one diameter for this part of the manifold (b) Downhill Side of the Manifold Largest Pipe Size, D1 B • • • First, determine the minimum pipe diameter for the first pipe in the downhill side of the manifold, which of course will be the largest of the pipe sizes that will be used This can be accomplished by finding the inside pipe diameter, D, that will give a friction loss curve tangent to the ground slope To do this, it is necessary to: (1) have the slope of the friction loss curve equal to So; and, (2) have the H values equal at this location (make them just touch at a point) These two requirements can be satisfied by applying two equations, whereby the two unknowns will be Q and D1 Assume that Ql is constant along the manifold… See the following figure, based on the length of the downstream part of the manifold, xd Some manifolds will only have a downhill part – others will have both uphill and downhill parts B • B B B B B • B B B H flow direction (∆Hm)a hf cu rv e • • ss D1 = ??? fr 0 0 i on ict lo 1 manifold flow rate ∆Em So Qm xd Sprinkle & Trickle Irrigation Lectures Page 267 Merkley & Allen • For the above figure, where the right side is the mainline location and the left side is the downstream closed end of the manifold, the friction loss curve is defined as: H = ( ∆Hm )a + ∆Em − hf + JFL 100 (463) where, using the Hazen-Williams equation, 1.852 ⎛Q⎞ J = K⎜ ⎟ ⎝C⎠ F= D−4.87 for 0 ≤ Q ≤ Qm (464) 1 1 0.852 + + 2.852 2N 6N2 ⎛ x ⎞⎛ Q ⎞ N = ⎜ d ⎟⎜ ⎟ ⎝ Sl ⎠ ⎝ Qm ⎠ (465) for N > 0 (466) where N is the number of outlets (laterals) from the location of “Q” in the manifold to the closed end ⎛Q⎞ L = xd ⎜ ⎟ ⎝ Qm ⎠ (467) For Q in lps and D in cm, K = 16.42(10)6 P • P The total head loss in the downhill side of the manifold is: 1.852 JFx ⎛Q ⎞ hf = hf hf d = 0.01K ⎜ m ⎟ 100 ⎝C⎠ D−4.87Fhf x d (468) where Fhf is defined as F above, except with N = xd/Sl. B • B B B B B The slope of the friction loss curve is: dH 1⎛ dJ dF dL ⎞ = FL + JL + JF ⎜ ⎟ dQ 100 ⎝ dQ dQ dQ ⎠ (469) where, Merkley & Allen Page 268 Sprinkle & Trickle Irrigation Lectures dJ 1.852KQ0.852 = dQ C1.852D4.87 dF xd ⎛ 1 0.852 ⎞ =− ⎜+ ⎟ dQ 3N ⎟ SlQmN2 ⎜ 2 ⎝ ⎠ (471) dL x =d dQ Qm • • (470) (472) Note that dH/dQ ≠ J The ground surface (assuming a constant slope, So) is defined by: B B ⎛Q⎞ H = SoL = So x d ⎜ ⎟ ⎝ Qm ⎠ (473) dH So x d = dQ Qm (474) and, • Combine the two equations defining H (this makes the friction loss curve just touch the ground surface): ⎛Q⎞ JFL So x d ⎜ ⎟ = ( ∆Hm )a + ∆Em − hf + 100 ⎝ Qm ⎠ • Solve the above equation for the inside diameter, D: ⎡ ⎛S x Q ⎞⎤ 100C1.852 ⎜ o d − ( ∆Hm )a − ∆Em ⎟ ⎥ ⎢ ⎝ Qm ⎠⎥ D=⎢ 1.852 1.852 ⎢ ⎥ KQ FL − Qm Fhf x d ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎣ ⎦ ( • (475) −0.205 ) (476) Set the slope of the friction loss curve equal to Soxd/Qm, B B B B So x d 1⎛ dJ dF dL ⎞ = + JL + JF ⎜ FL ⎟ Qm 100 ⎝ dQ dQ dQ ⎠ Sprinkle & Trickle Irrigation Lectures Page 269 B B (477) Merkley & Allen • • • Combine the above two equations so that the only unknown is Q (note: D appears in the J & dJ/dQ terms of the above equation) Solve for Q by iteration; the pipe inside diameter, D, will be known as part of the solution for Q The calculated value of D is the minimum inside pipe diameter, so find the nearest available pipe size that is larger than or equal to D: D1 ≥ D minimize(D1 − D) & (478) Slope of the Tangent Line B • Now calculate the equation of the line through the origin and tangent to the friction loss curve for D1 Let St be the slope of the tangent line B • B B B ⎛Q⎞ H = StL = St x d ⎜ ⎟ ⎝ Qm ⎠ (479) ⎛Q⎞ JFL St x d ⎜ ⎟ = ( ∆Hm )a + ∆El − hf + 100 ⎝ Qm ⎠ (480) then, • Set the slope of the friction loss curve equal to Stxd/Qm, B B B B B B St x d 1⎛ dJ dF dL ⎞ = + JL + JF ⎜ FL ⎟ Qm 100 ⎝ dQ dQ dQ ⎠ • • (481) Combine the above two equations to eliminate St, and solve for Q (which is different than the Q in Eq. 476) Calculate the slope, St, directly B B B B Smaller (Downstream) Pipe Sizes B • Then take the next smaller pipe size, D2, and make its friction loss curve tangent to the same line (slope = St); B B B H = H0 + JFL 100 B (482) where H0 is a vertical offset to make the friction loss curve tangent to the St line, emanating from the origin B B B B Merkley & Allen Page 270 Sprinkle & Trickle Irrigation Lectures • Equating heads and solving for H0, B B ⎛ Q ⎞ JFL H0 = St x d ⎜ ⎟− ⎝ Qm ⎠ 100 • (483) Again, set the slope of the friction loss curve equal to St, B B St x d 1⎛ dJ dF dL ⎞ = + JL + JF ⎜ FL ⎟ Qm 100 ⎝ dQ dQ dQ ⎠ • • • (484) Solve the above equation for Q, then solve directly for H0 Now you have the equation for the next friction loss curve Determine the intersection with the D1 friction loss curve to set the length for size D1; this is done by equating the H values for the respective equations and solving for Q at the intersection: B B B B B B −4.87 −4.87 (Dbig − Dsmall ) = 0 1.852 FLK ⎛ Q ⎞ Hbig − Hsmall + ⎜⎟ 100 ⎝ C ⎠ (485) where, for the first pipe size (D1): B B Hbig = ( ∆Hm )a + ∆El − hf (486) and for the second pipe size (D2): B B Hsmall = H0 (487) and F & L are as defined in Eqs. 437 to 439. • Then, the length of pipe D1 is equal to: B B ⎛ Q⎞ LD1 = x d ⎜ 1 − ⎟ ⎝ Qm ⎠ • (488) Continue this process until you have three or four pipe sizes, or until you get to a pipe size that has D < ½D1 B Sprinkle & Trickle Irrigation Lectures B Page 271 Merkley & Allen Comments about the HGL Method B • • • The above equation development could also be done using the DarcyWeisbach equation Specify a minimum length for each pipe size in the manifold so that the design is not something ridiculous (i.e. don’t just blindly perform calculations, but look at what you have) For example, the minimum allowable pipe length might be something like 5Sl Note that the friction loss curves must be shifted vertically upward to provide the correct average (or minimum, if pressure regulators are used) pressure head in the manifold; this shifting process determines the required manifold inlet pressure head, Hm Below is a screen shot from a computer program that uses the HGL method for manifold pipe sizing B • B B • Merkley & Allen Page 272 B Sprinkle & Trickle Irrigation Lectures Sprinkle & Trickle Irrigation Lectures Page 273 Merkley & Allen Merkley & Allen Page 274 Sprinkle & Trickle Irrigation Lectures ...
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