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MIT OpenCourseWare http://ocw.mit.edu 12.001 Introduction to Geology Spring 2008 For information about citing these materials or our Terms of Use, visit: http://ocw.mit.edu/terms .
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L. T. Elkins-Tanton Mars Fundamental Research Program The effects of magma ocean depth and initial composition on planetary differentiation (Image courtesy of NASA/JPL.)
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Formation of new stars and planets protoplanetary nebula = planetary nebula = preplanetary nebula, NEBULAS, not new SOLAR SYSTEMS protoplanetary disk = proplyd accretionary disk (this really refers just to the star) Horsehead nebula: NASA, NOAO, ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) Eagle nebula: Hester, Scowen (ASU), HST, NASA
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Rotating nebula begins to contract Images removed due to copyright restrictions.
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Contraction and rotation of protoplanetary disk Images removed due to copyright restrictions.
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Ca-Al inclusions in carbonaceous chondrites: 4567.2±0.6 million years old Images removed due to copyright restrictions.
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Accretion simulations Planetary accretion simulation from Raymond et al. (2006), using 1054 initial planetesimals from 1 to 10 km radius. Earthlike planets are formed, but their orbital eccentricities are too high. Images removed due to copyright restrictions.
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Size of the planets Images courtesy of NASA.
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Young planets are hot Factors lead to heating and melting early in a terrestrial planet’s history Radioactive decay of elements Accretion of large bodies (meters [planetesimals] to hundreds of kilometers [embryos]) Converts kinetic energy to heat Core formation Converts potential energy to heat
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Global Chemical Differentiation Images removed due to copyright restrictions.
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Iron meteorites: The cores of failed planetesimals Images removed due to copyright restrictions.
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Short-lived radioisotopes
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This note was uploaded on 03/01/2012 for the course PHYS 6210 taught by Professor Charlestorre during the Spring '07 term at Utah State University.

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13_plntry_frmtn - MIT OpenCourseWare http:/ocw.mit.edu...

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