lec2 - Basic Review tom.h.wilson tom.wilson@mail.wvu.edu...

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Basic Review tom.h.wilson tom.wilson@mail.wvu.edu Department of Geology and Geography West Virginia University Morgantown, WV
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Let’s take a short tour of the Excel files provided by Waltham that are coordinated with text exercises and discussions Click on this link Take a look at the following: Intro.xls Exp.xls Integ.xls
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Try to log into your computer accounts There should not be anything in your accounts at this time but you should be able to log on.
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6’ 8’ 1. 2 2. 0 3. 5 4. 1 5. 5 6. 6 7. 2 8. 11 9. 3 10. 2 11. 2
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Subscripts and superscripts provide information about specific variables and define mathematical operations. k 1 and k 2 for example could be used to denote sedimentation constants for different areas or permeabilities of different rock specimens. See Waltham for additional examples of subscript notation.
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The geologist’s use of math often turns out to be a periodic and necessary endeavor. As time goes by you may find yourself scratching your head pondering once- mastered concepts that you suddenly find a need for. This is often the fate of basic power rules. Evaluate the following x a x b = x a / x b = (x a ) b = x a+b x a-b x ab
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[ ] 5 0 5 5log log5| none of these | | | ( )log ( )log | | | none of these 0|1| | none of these ( ) | | | none of these a bc b c b c b f f fg g g b c b cb cbc a aa a a a a a ca b c a a f g aa a a a a a + +  =  = ×+ + = −  = = ×
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Question 1.2a Simplify and where possible evaluate the following expressions - i) 3 2 x 3 4 ii) (4 2 ) 2+2 iii) g i . g k iv) D 1.5 . D 2
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Exponential notation is a useful way to represent really big numbers in a small space and also for making rapid computations involving large numbers - for example, the mass of the earth is 5970000000000000000000000 kg the mass of the moon is 73500000000000000000000 kg Express the mass of the earth in terms of the lunar mass.
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While you’re working through that with pencil and paper let me write down these two masses in exponential notation.
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lec2 - Basic Review tom.h.wilson tom.wilson@mail.wvu.edu...

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