LECTURE_2_CS113_2010 - CS113 Introduction to Computing for...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–12. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 CS113 Introduction to Computing for Engineers Introduction to Matlab
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 How and why do engineers need computers to solve problems? We all know that engineers (as well as everyone else) use computer to communicate (email), write reports (word processing), make presentations (powerpoint), conduct research (web), do their taxes, check the football scores, play games …. That is not what we talking about here! Given a technical problem to solve how and why do engineers use computers to solve those problems?
Background image of page 2
3 Why do engineers need computers to solve problems? In the past engineers were only able to solve problems using trial and error experimentation and pencil/ paper/slide rule calculations. Most of the problems we face today, however, are far too complicated to be solved with paper and pencil and far too expensive to solve using trial and error experimentation
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
4 Economic Impact of Technical Computing Airlines: System-wide logistics optimization systems on parallel systems. Savings: approx. $100 million per airline per year. Automotive design: Major automotive companies use large systems (500+ CPUs) for: CAD-CAM, crash testing, structural integrity and aerodynamics. One company has 500+ CPU parallel system. Savings: approx. $1 billion per company per year. Semiconductor industry: Semiconductor firms use large systems (500+ CPUs) for device electronics simulation and logic validation Savings: approx. $1 billion per company per year. Securities industry: Savings: approx. $15 billion per year for U.S. home mortgages. Cartoon industry: Massive “rendering farms” for “drawing” each frame: BIG $$$.
Background image of page 4
5 Computer Systems Software applications Hardware Devices Inputs from users Outputs to users
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
6 Computer Hardware Case Power switch Reset switch Hard drive Floppy CD/DVD Serial ports Parallel port USB port Keyboard/mouse Network card Modem Sound card Video card RAM Motherboard Fan Cables
Background image of page 6
7 The basic system including keyboard, mouse and monitor.
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
8 What is in the box? Motherboard
Background image of page 8
9 Typical parts of a motherboard.
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
10 Disk capacities Floppy: 1.4 MB Hard disk: 20 GB – 160 GB CD 700 - 800 MB DVD 4.7 GB 17 GB 1 KILOBYTE = 1000 BYTE 1 MEGABYTE = 1000 KB 1 GIGABYTE = 1000 MB
Background image of page 10
11 Computer Software: Operating systems All computer systems have an operating system. Operating systems are the life support system for
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 12
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 52

LECTURE_2_CS113_2010 - CS113 Introduction to Computing for...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 12. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online