problems

problems - ADDITIONAL HOMEWORK PROBLEMS: ECON 371 Spring...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
ADDITIONAL HOMEWORK PROBLEMS: ECON 371 Spring 2008
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
1 Chapter 2 Note: Unlike later additional questions, these two questions use data sets provided with Anderson, Sweeny, and Williams. 1) On page 58 of Anderson, Sweeny, and Williams, read problem 40 and examine the data set. Using Minitab, open the data set for this problem, “Golf,” and then perform the following operations in Minitab: a) Tally the data to get counts for each possible response. b) Using the Chart command, make a bar chart for the frequency and percent frequencies for each possible response. c) Make a pie chart of the data, labeling each slice with percent. 2) On page 61 of Anderson, Sweeny, and Williams, read problem 46 and examine the data set. Using Minitab, open the data set “High-Low” and then perform the following operations in Minitab: a) Make dotplots of high and low temperatures, with both dotplots overlaid in the same diagram. b) Make boxplots of both high and low temperatures, with both boxplots overlaid in the same diagram. c) Make a frequency histogram of the high temperatures. d) Make a percent frequency histogram of the low temperatures. e) Make a cumulative frequency histogram of the high temperatures. f) Make a stem-and-leaf display of the low temperatures. g) Plot the high temperatures against the low temperatures, putting the high temperatures on the Y-axis.
Background image of page 2
2 Chapter 4 1) Given P[A] = .5 and P[A B] = .6, find P[B] if: a) A and B are mutually exclusive. b) A and B are independent c) P[A|B] = .4. 2) A certain hapless individual can never remember whether the dishes in the dishwasher are clean or dirty. Eighty per cent of the time, he runs the dishwasher immediately after loading it, so eighty per cent of the time the dishes are clean. But twenty per cent of the time, he forgets to start the dishwasher, leaving the dishes dirty. Finding the dishwasher full, and unable to remember if the dishes are clean, he reaches into the dishwasher, pulls out a glass, and holds it up to the light. Unfortunately, this isn't a perfect test. Ten per cent of his glasses would look clean even without being run through the dishwasher. Five per cent would look dirty, even if they had been run through the dishwasher. If the glass looks clean, what is the probability that the dishwasher has been run? If the glass looks dirty, what is the probability that the dishwasher has been run? 3) Of all of Michael Jordan's fans: 25% wear Nikes 10% wear Nikes and eat Wheaties 30% eat Wheaties 8% wear Nikes and drink Gatorade 15% drink Gatorade 5% drink Gatorade and eat Wheaties 2% wear Nikes, eat Wheaties, and drink Gatorade What is the probability that a randomly selected Michael Jordan fan: a) Uses one or more of these products? b) Drinks Gatorade or eats Wheaties, or does both? c) Wears Nikes given that he consumes either Gatorade or Wheaties?
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 27

problems - ADDITIONAL HOMEWORK PROBLEMS: ECON 371 Spring...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online