Gilded Age Politician

Gilded Age - Gilded Age Politician Adlai E Stevenson of Illinois and His Times Author(s Leonard Schlup Reviewed work(s Source Illinois Historical

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Gilded Age Politician: Adlai E. Stevenson of Illinois and His Times Author(s): Leonard Schlup Reviewed work(s): Source: IllinoisHistoricalJournal, Vol. 82, No. 4 (Winter, 1989), pp. 218-230 Published by: University of Illinois Press on behalf of the Illinois State Historical Society Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40192447 . Accessed: 25/01/2012 23:38 . http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact [email protected] University of Illinois Press and Illinois State Historical Society are collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to Illinois Historical Journal. http://www.jstor.org
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Four generations: Eliza Ann Ewing Stevenson, the Vice-President, his daugh- ter Julia Scott Stevenson Hardin, and grandchild Letitia Hardin
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Gilded Age Politician Adlai E. Stevenson of Illinois and His Times LEONARD SCHLUP -/Although ignored by historians or relegated to footnote status in history books, Adlai Ewing Stevenson, Vice-President of the United States from 1893 to 1897, was a prominent if enigmatic political personality during the Gilded Age. Among Illinoisans, he is probably better known as patriarch of a Democratic dynasty whose namesakes included an Illinois governor and a member of the United States Senate. Born in Kentucky in 1835, Stevenson moved with his parents to Bloomington, Illinois, in 1852; he studied law and embarked on a political career that resulted in his election to Congress for two nonconsecutive terms in the 1870s. Those years constituted a preparatory period upon which he built his reputation as a Leonard Schlup is on the staff of the Akron-Summit County Public Library in Akron, Ohio. A native of Ohio, he earned a master of library science degree at Indiana University and a doctorate in history from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He was awarded the 1969 Fellowship for Graduate Study from the Illinois State Historical Society. He has published extensively on the life of Adlai E. Stevenson, the subject of his dissertation, and on various aspects of American political history. 219
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The Stevenson home in Bloomington. Seated on the laxvn are the Vice-President, his wife Letitia, and daughter Mary. Standing behind them are children Letitia, Julia, and Lewis. party accommodationist and from which he emerged to the nation's second-highest office.1 Stevenson's years in Congress set the pattern that characterized his later life in Washington. As a
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This note was uploaded on 02/29/2012 for the course HIST 232 taught by Professor Charliewilliams during the Spring '12 term at Emory.

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Gilded Age - Gilded Age Politician Adlai E Stevenson of Illinois and His Times Author(s Leonard Schlup Reviewed work(s Source Illinois Historical

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