Week_2 - Computer Forensics: Basics C la s s 3 C o m p u te...

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© 2007 Purdue University Marcus K. Rogers CIT 1 Computer Forensics: Basics Class 3 Computer/Technology Law
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© 2007 Purdue University Marcus K. Rogers CIT 2 Learning Objectives • At the end of this module you will be able to: – Describe the various major world legal systems – Explain the differences between civil and criminal law – Discuss the various types of intellectual property protections
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© 2007 Purdue University Marcus K. Rogers CIT 3 Major Categories of Law Civil Law Common Law – Criminal Law – Contract Law – Civil (Tort) Law – Administrative Law Customary Law Religious Law Mixed Law Systems
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© 2007 Purdue University Marcus K. Rogers CIT 4 Legal Systems in the World Common Law Systems • The law developed in historical England. • It is based on tradition, past practices, and legal precedents set by courts through interpretation of statutes, legal legislation, and past rulings.
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© 2007 Purdue University Marcus K. Rogers CIT 5 Legal Systems in the World Civil Law or Code Law Systems • Originally civil law was a common legal system to much of Europe; however with the development of nationalism around the time of the French Revolution it became fractured into separate national systems. • It is based on a comprehensive system of written rules of law and divided into commercial, civil, and criminal codes .
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© 2007 Purdue University Marcus K. Rogers CIT 6 Administrative or Regulatory Law • Standards of performance and conduct expected by official regulatory bodies from organizations, industries, and certain officials or officers. • Banks • Insurance companies • Stock markets • Food and drug companies
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© 2007 Purdue University Marcus K. Rogers CIT 7 Customary Law Systems • Customary law plays a significant role in matters of personal conduct. • Its foundation is based on customs, traditions, etc. • Predominantly found in countries or political entities with mixed legal systems: – African countries, China, India
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© 2007 Purdue University Marcus K. Rogers CIT 8 Muslim Systems • The Muslim legal system is an autonomous legal system which is actually religious in nature and predominantly based on the Qur’an. • Traditionally divided into: – Religious duties – Obligations to other people
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© 2007 Purdue University Marcus K. Rogers CIT 9 Mixed Law Systems • This category includes political entities where two or more systems apply cumulatively or interactively (e.g., Civil and Common Law). • Examples South Africa, Scotland
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© 2007 Purdue University Marcus K. Rogers CIT 10 Legal Systems in North America • Common Law System – Major important categories include: • Criminal Law • Civil Law • Administrative or Regulatory Law
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© 2007 Purdue University Marcus K. Rogers CIT 11 Legal Systems in North America • Criminal Law – Individual conduct that violates government laws that are enacted for the protection of the public. – Violations of criminal law regarding computer
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This note was uploaded on 02/29/2012 for the course CNIT 420 taught by Professor Dr.marcrogers during the Spring '12 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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Week_2 - Computer Forensics: Basics C la s s 3 C o m p u te...

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