Entry - Entry: Where did it come from? Bacteria enter the...

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Entry: Where did it come from? Bacteria enter the blood stream by translocation from the contained source or by direct inoculation. Transient bacteremias, defined as bacteremia of short duration (15-30 minutes), occur daily, for example as a consequence of defecation or brushing one’s teeth. Any break in the skin barrier or trauma to heavily colonized mucosal surfaces is a potential source of direct inoculation into the blood stream. Intravenous drug use is a substantial risk for bacteremia. The type of transient bacteremia depends on the colonizing organisms at the site of entry. Table 1 depicts some common organisms documented at sites of entry: Table 1. Microorganisms Associated with Spontaneous or Procedure Related Transient Bacteremia Site Activity or Procedure Microorganisms Oral Cavity Brushing Teeth, Chewing Dental extraction Periodontal surgery α-hemolytic streptococci (Viridans group), anaerobic streptococci, dipththeroids Skin Intravenous or arterial catheters; Chronic skin lesions
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This note was uploaded on 03/02/2012 for the course BSC BSC1086 taught by Professor Joystewart during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Entry - Entry: Where did it come from? Bacteria enter the...

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