Fall 2010 Lecture 21 Cultural Resources and Managing the Past plus Hoaxes

Fall 2010 Lecture 21 Cultural Resources and Managing the Past plus Hoaxes

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Cultural Resource Management (CRM) Cultural resources are the human-made and natural physical features associated with human activity. They are unique and nonrenewable and can include sites, structures, and artifacts significant in history or prehistory. Cultural resource management (CRM) is the application of management skills to preserve important parts of our cultural heritage, both historic and prehistoric, for the benefit of the public today and in the future.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Acts of Preservation Antiquities Act of 1906 . The first formal preservation of America’s past began with the passage of this act, primarily aimed at controlling a lucrative trade in painted pueblo pots from the Southwest. Historic Sites Act of 1935 . This baseline act gave the National Park Service a broad mandate to identify, protect, and preserve cultural properties. Numerous state and Native American tribal laws amplify and complicate this already complex legislative picture.
Background image of page 2
Pre-Historic bowl. Black on red design on the inside, with a red slipped exterior. I'm not sure what this bowl is called. Unusual design. Plain zigzag band above solid black triangles, and straight horizontal lines above. It has a narrow black line below the rim. Broken and tightly glued from 5 pieces. 2 pre-historic repair holes. 1 small area of spauling on the interior design, and 2 small rim chips. No restoration. It measures 8 3/4 x 4 1/2 deep. Came from a Colorado man who collected this about 1950. He's now 88 years old. This is guaranteed authentic. It's a legal piece, and will come with a release statement. This is a very nice bowl. Buyer pays for shipping and insurance.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Acts of Preservation Reservoir Salvage Act of 1960 . This act authorized archaeologists to dig and salvage sites that were in danger of destruction. Historic Preservation Act of 1966. This act set up a national framework for historic preservation, requiring the federal government to establish a nationwide system for identifying, protecting, and rehabilitating what are commonly called ‘historic places.” The act called for the establishment of the National Register of Historic Places (a “historic place” could include prehistoric and historic archaeological sites) and re-quired federal agencies to protect Register properties when development projects were planned.
Background image of page 4
Acts of Preservation National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). The NEPA went far beyond protection and laid down a comprehensive policy for government land-use planning and resource management. It requires federal agencies to weigh environmental, historical, and cultural values when-ever federally owned land is modified or private land is modified with federal funds. NEPA ordered all federal agencies to take the lead in his-toric preservation and to locate properties that might qualify for the National Register. They were also to develop programs to contribute to protection of important historic properties on non-federal lands.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 03/04/2012 for the course PUBH 2113 taught by Professor Edberg during the Fall '11 term at GWU.

Page1 / 80

Fall 2010 Lecture 21 Cultural Resources and Managing the Past plus Hoaxes

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online