BasicThermo

BasicThermo - Review of classical thermodynamics...

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MSE 3050, Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Materials, Leonid Zhigilei Review of classical thermodynamics Fundamental Laws, Properties and Processes (1) First Law - Energy Balance Thermodynamic functions of state Internal energy, heat and work Types of paths (isobaric, isochoric, isothermal, adiabatic, cyclic) Enthalpy, heat capacity, heat of formation, phase transformations Calculation of enthalpy as a function of temperature Heats of reactions and the Hess±s law Reading: Chapters 2, 6.1, 6.4 of Gaskell or the same material in any other textbook on thermodynamics
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MSE 3050, Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Materials, Leonid Zhigilei Thermodynamic variables What are thermodynamics variables? There are two approaches to describe properties and behavior of a material: 1. Microscopic approach -to descr ibe the ma ter ia l in terms of microscopic variables (positions, velocities, charges, etc. of all particles in the system). But there are too many particles (N A = 6.022×10 23 mol -1 ) and this approach in unpractical in most cases. 2. Classical (continuum) thermodynamics ±to d e s c r ib e th e material in terms of average quantities, or thermodynamic variables , such as temperature, internal energy, pressure, etc. Statistical thermodynamics provides the connection between the classical thermodynamics and the behavior of the microscopic constituents of matter (atoms and molecules). Although in this course we will focus on classical thermodynamics, we will also consider a few elements of statistical thermodynamics, in particular in our discussion of heat capacity and entropy. What are state variables and functions? System at equilibrium can be described by a number of thermodynamic variables that are independent of the history of the system . Such variables are called state variables or state functions depending on the context. We can describe a system by a set of independent state variables and we can express other variables ( state functions ) through this set of independent variables. For example, we can describe ideal gas by P and T and use V = RT/P to define molar volume V. For different applications we can choose different sets of independent variables that are the most convenient.
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This note was uploaded on 03/05/2012 for the course MSE 305 taught by Professor Zhigilei,l during the Spring '08 term at UVA.

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BasicThermo - Review of classical thermodynamics...

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