2116+PP+Unit+0.1+ppt

2116+PP+Unit+0.1+ppt - Music 2116 Music Welcome! Pick up 2...

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Unformatted text preview: Music 2116 Music Welcome! Pick up 2 handouts on the console on stage MUSIC 2115, 2116 MUSIC s s s s s s s s s Survey of Music—a 2­semester course A history course, with the focus on music May take one or both courses May take in either order Interest in how music has developed Ability to read music not required Satisfies Areas 2 or 6 in the Core Curriculum Does not fulfill requirement for Music Majors Required course for Music Minors. OTHER CHOICES OTHER s s This may not be the best choice for everyone! Music Appreciation – Music 1104—one semester course – Four sections offered, three on­line s Music in America – – – Music 3115, 3116—two separate courses Fall: Classical Music Spring: Jazz. Music 2116—Today! Music s s s s s PICK UP TWO FORMS FROM THE CONSOLE DOWN FRONT FILL OUT THE SMALL ONE AND LEAVE IT DOWN FRONT TODAY KEEP THE LARGE ONE FOR YOUR INFORMATION IF YOU DECIDE TO DROP THE CLASS, PLEASE EMAIL ME SO I CAN TAKE YOU OFF THE CLASS ROLL AND EMAIL LIST Sign up (on the wall next to my office) for a Due Date for your required Concert Review; first come, first served— sign up for three if you choose Option 3. Materials for MUS 2115, 2116 Materials s Textbook: – Hanning, Concise History of Western Music, 4th ed. – Same text used for both courses s Listening CDs: – Norton Recorded Anthology of Western Music, Concise Version, 6 CDs – Same set used for both courses. Syllabus etc. Syllabus s All class materials are available on­line and will not be given out on paper – – – – s s Syllabus Course Calendar Writing Requirements Additional materials Web address, e­mail address are on today’s handout Some lecture materials may not be in the textbook. Scholar Scholar s s Scholar is a web­based class management program In this course it is used for specific things – Extra Credit Quizzes – Raw copies of the Class Powerpoint Presentations. Norton Study Space Norton On the W.W. Norton Website for the Hanning textbook s Has Quizzes for each Chapter s Has Listening Quizzes for each Chapter s I think that you can access the Website at no charge, but you may need the registration code that comes bound in your textbook. s Course Objectives Course s s s s Understand how musical styles begin, grow, mature, and decline Recognize and identify what makes musical styles distinctive Understand the terminology Familiarity with the music of important individual composers. What to Expect in this Course Regular attendance expected but not checked s Reading and listening assignments for almost every class meeting s A short Chapter Quiz on terms or listening to be completed before or after almost every class meeting, depending on the Grading Option you choose. s What to Expect in this Course s E­mail account required – Contact the instructor at any time with questions— email address on the handout – Grades & updates will be distributed by email – Give me you real e­mail address on the small form s Internet access required – All class documents are on the web page, on the Norton website, or on Scholar s You must choose the Option under which you will be graded (see Syllabus page). Grading Option 1: “Bet It All” Grading s s s s s s Three Unit Quizzes count 60% of your final grade Final Exam counts 30% of your final grade One required Concert Review counts 10% of your final grade You must send me your Option Choice by Wed Jan 26 at 23:59:59 by email Anyone who does not contact me will be placed on Option 1 If you think you might switch Options during the switch period, go ahead and take the Quizzes on the Norton website. Grading Option 2: “Hedge Your Bets” Bets” s s s s s Three Unit Quizzes count 50% of your final grade Final Exam counts 25% of your final grade Terms and Listening Quizzes on the Norton website count 15% of your final grade One required Concert Review counts 10% of your final grade Send me your Option choice by Wed Jan 26. Grading Option 3: “Play It Safe” Grading s s s s s s s Three Unit Quizzes count 45% of your final grade Final Exam counts 20% of your final grade Terms and Listening Quizzes on the Norton website count 15% of your final grade One required Concert Review counts 10% of your final grade Two additional Reviews or Research Papers count 5% each on your final grade Send me your Option choice by Wed Jan 26 You will have one opportunity to change Options, during the week after the Unit 4 Quiz, by email before 23:59:59 on Wednesday, Feb 23. Extra Credit Opportunities Extra s s s s s s A preliminary Unit Quiz on the material that is covered the first week, to be completed on Blackboard by 2355 pm Thursday, Jan 26, worth up to 3% extra credit on your final grade A Pre­Review written assignment to be turned in by email attachment by 11:59:59 pm Mon Jan 31, worth an automatic 2% extra credit on your final grade if the instructions are followed A “ReadMe” or “Rules” Quiz on the 2116 “Rules” web page, to be completed on Blackboard by 23:55 pm Wed Feb 2, worth up to 3% extra credit on your final grade A bonus of 15% added to your score for Concert Reviews turned in by email attachment TWO WEEKS EARLY A bonus of 10% added to your score for Concert Reviews turned in by email attachment ONE WEEK EARLY (But check out the penalties for being late!). Grading Grading s s s s s Grades are not curved and are based on weighted percentages I do not “round up”! The 3 Options let you choose from a variety of activities The “normal” % cutoff points for specific letter grades have been lowered a bit since some extra credit opportunities have now been built into the 3 Options (see Syllabus page) You will receive the grade in this course that you earn, and the time to start earning it is now! Area 2 and Area 6 Goals Area s s s A statement of how this course meets those Core Curriculum goals is included in the on­line Syllabus This class does not meet General Education or Music Minor requirements if it is audited or taken P/F There may be a Student Survey regarding Core Curriculum goals at the end of the semester. Coming events… Coming s s s s Friday: Presentation, not from textbook Monday: Continuation Next Wednesday: Regular lectures based on the textbook begin (Unit 4, Chapter 14) Thu Jan 26: Complete Introductory Unit Quiz on Scholar. Coming events … Coming s s s s When you leave class today, there will be several things already up on Scholar To access it, use the URL learn.vt.edu without www Raw duplicates of Class Powerpoint presentations and downloads of those presentations are on the page titled “PowerPoints” Also find the W.W. Norton Study Space for this textbook, and register on the website if that is required. What are the elements that make up different musical forms?. forms?. Musical form Musical s Music has a “center of gravity” – A tonic is implied by any melody – A tonal center is implied by the harmony Musical form can be shaped by changing tonal centers s Changing tonal centers is called “modulation”. s The Melodic Tonal Center The s The tonic—usually the final note • • s The dominant—a 5th above the tonic The subdomninant—a 5th below the tonic • • • • Major: half­steps between 3­4 and 7­8 Minor: half­steps between 2­3 and 5­6 Church modes Special scales. “Key” or “mode” established by placement of half­steps The Harmonic Tonal Center The s The tonic chord is the final resting point – The subdominant chord moves away from the tonic chord (the half­step from the 3rd degree of the scale pulls up to the 4th degree—the subdominant) – The dominant chord moves back to the tonic chord (the half­step from the 7th degree of the scale pulls up to the 1st degree) s “Functional harmony” means that every chord has a “function” in relation to the tonic, pulling away from it or pulling back to it. Tonal Centers as a Variable Tonal s s “Modulation,” a change from one tonal center to another, can define form 20th century efforts to abolish tonality in “art” music • • • • s Bi­tonality—2 tonal centers present Polytonality—2 or more tonal centers present Pantonality—all tonal centers present Atonality—no tonal center present Popular music still uses tonal centers and functional harmony. Reading music notation Reading s s s The 5 lines of the “staff” are a simple graph The vertical axis indicates pitch, from low to high, using both the lines and the spaces, and is labeled with a “clef” that identifies the pitches The horizontal axis measures time, reading from left to right, and is divided into “measures” by “bar lines”. Notation continued Notation Along with the clef, there is a “key signature” at the beginning indicating which notes are to be raised or lowered throughout the piece with “sharp” (#) or “flat” (b) signs s These can be temporarily altered during the piece by “sharp,” “flat,” or “natural” signs attached to individual notes. s Notation continued Notation The third labeling element is a “time signature” made up of two numbers s The upper number tells how many pulses or “beats” there are in each measure s The lower number tells what note value gets the “beat” s The division of the measures into regular beats is the “meter” of the piece. s Notation completed Notation s s s s s s s s The color and shape of the notes indicates their relative time value American terminology uses fractions A “whole note” is white with no stem, and is worth 4 beats A “half note” is white with a stem, and is worth 2 beats A “quarter note” is black with a stem, and is worth 1 beat An “eighth note” is black with a stem and a flag, and is worth half a beat There are also specific signs for rests for each note value A dot after a note or rest adds half its value to the note. ...
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