Chapter20 - Concise History of Western Music Fourth Edition...

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By Barbara Russano Hanning Based on J. Peter Burkholder, Donald J. Grout, and Claude V. Palisca, A History of Western Music , Eighth Edition Concise History of Western Music Fourth Edition Chapter 20 The Later Romantics
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PRELUDE
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Interest in past music The new discipline of musicology studied music from the Renaissance and Baroque. The complete works of Bach were published (1851–99). German scholars and publishers led this movement. Public concerts now presented music from the past.
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Reconciling the past with the present Living composers had to appeal to audiences familiar with the classics. Some competed with the old masters in the Classical genres. Others created new genres. These differing attitudes polarized around Brahms and Wagner.
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Reconciling the past with the present Advocates of absolute music (music understood on its own terms), such as Eduard Hanslick, challenged the principles of program music. Advocates of program music, such as Wagner and Liszt, felt that the legacy of Beethoven pointed in this direction.
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FRANZ LISZT (1811–1886)
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Influences His heritage is evident in his Hungarian melodies and rhythms. He had training in Viennese classics and a strong sense of French literary Romanticism. Liszt absorbed a number of Chopin’s qualities when he came to Paris in 1831.
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Influences Nicolò Paganini (1782–1840) was perhaps Liszt’s most important influence. A hypnotic performer, Paganini raised violin virtuosity to new heights. Liszt vowed to do the same for the piano. He pushed piano technique in his own playing and in his compositions, particularly his six Études d’exécution transcendante d’après Paganini (Transcendental Technical Studies Based on Paganini, 1851). Liszt also transcribed numerous Paganini works.
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Liszt was an astounding piano virtuoso He was the first to give solo concerts in large halls, which he termed recitals . He became the high priest of the piano.
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Un sospiro (A Sigh) This is the third of his Trois études de concert (1849). It examines the technical problem of projecting a slow moving melody while playing rapid figurations.
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Other piano works Transcriptions include works based on Schubert songs, Berlioz and Beethoven symphonies, Bach organ fugues, and Wagner operas. Liszt also introduced Hungarian elements into works such as the nineteen Hungarian Rhapsodies .
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The Sonata in B Minor (1853) In one extended movement, it has three sections that are analogous to the movements of a Classical sonata. The work is unified by four main themes that are transformed and combined in a free manner. The late piano works contain surprising
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This note was uploaded on 03/02/2012 for the course MUS 2116 taught by Professor Howell during the Spring '07 term at Virginia Tech.

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Chapter20 - Concise History of Western Music Fourth Edition...

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