{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Chapter21 - Concise History of Western Music Fourth Edition...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–17. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
© 2010, W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. By Barbara Russano Hanning Based on J. Peter Burkholder, Donald J. Grout, and Claude V. Palisca, A History of Western Music , Eighth Edition Concise History of Western Music Fourth Edition Chapter 21 Music in the Later Nineteenth Century: Europe, Nationalism, and the Classical Tradition in America
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
PRELUDE
Image of page 2
Rise of national styles An international style was created in the eighteenth century. The nineteenth century saw a movement toward nationalism. Emphasis on native literature and linguistic traditions Interest in folklore Patriotism Craving for independent identity
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Rise of national styles Germany and Italy became unified countries. Musical nationalism was particularly strong in Russia and in the countries of eastern Europe.
Image of page 4
Other trends France explored new paths of making music. Italian opera became more realistic. The Austro-German classical tradition was transplanted to the United States.
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
THE AUSTRO-GERMAN TRADITION
Image of page 6
Wagnerian influence Many composers fell under the spell of Wagner. Most sought to find their own voice while exploring his innovations in harmony and orchestration. Preferred genres Solo song with piano accompaniment Symphony and symphonic poem Opera
Image of page 7

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Hugo Wolf (1860-1903) Wolf is best known for adapting Wagner’s methods to the German lied. Wolf composed 250 lieder, mostly during periods of intense activity between 1887 and 1897. He published five principal collections of songs, each devoted to a single poet or group, thereby stressing an equality of words and music.
Image of page 8
Hugo Wolf (1860-1903) Like Wagner, he worked toward a fusion of poetry and music, and of voice and piano. Lebe wohl! (Farewell!), from the Mörike songbook, reflects Wagner’s influences. The arioso vocal line has speechlike rhythms. Continuity is sustained in the piano part. Chromatic harmonies are inspired by the idiom of Tristan und Isolde .
Image of page 9

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Lebe wohl! , mm. 1-2
Image of page 10
GUSTAV MAHLER (1860–1911)
Image of page 11

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
His life Mahler was the leading Austro-German composer of symphonies after Brahms and one of the great masters for voice and orchestra. Mahler influenced Schoenberg, Berg, and Webern.
Image of page 12
Symphonies He conveyed a sense of life experience in his symphonies. Many project or imply a program
Image of page 13

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Symphonies Songs played a large role Themes from his Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen (Songs of a Wayfarer) appear in his Symphony No. 1. Voices are included in four symphonies. Symphonies Nos. 2, 3, and 4 use themes from Mahler’s songs based on texts from Des Knaben Wunderhorn (The Boy’s Magic Horn).
Image of page 14
Symphonies Orchestration Huge numbers of performers, extending up to Symphony No. 8, the “Symphony of a Thousand” Great imagination in the combination of instruments, often only a few playing at a time
Image of page 15

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Song cycles with orchestra Kindertotenlieder (Songs on the Death of Children, 1901–4) is based on poems by Friedrich Ruckert. ̈ The spare use of instruments creates a chamber-music-like transparency.
Image of page 16
Image of page 17
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern