7_digital

7_digital - Introduction to digital systems Juan P Bello...

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Introduction to digital systems Juan P Bello
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Analogue vs Digital (1) Analog information is made up of a continuum of values within a given range At its most basic, digital information can assume only one of two possible values: one/zero, on/off, high/low, true/false, etc.
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Digital Information is less susceptible to noise than analog information Exact voltage values are not important, only their class (1 or 0) The complexity of operations is reduced, thus it is easier to implement them with high accuracy in digital form BUT: Most physical quantities are analog, thus a conversion is needed Analogue vs Digital (2)
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Logical operations (1) Truth table
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Logical operations (2) These logic gates are the basic building blocks of all digital systems
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Numeral Systems Notation system using a limited set of symbols to express numbers uniquely We are most familiar with the positional, base-10 (decimal), Hindu-Arabic numeral system: Least significant digit, to the right, assumes its own value. As we move to the left, the value is multiplied by the base.
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Binary system (1) Digital systems represent information using a binary system, where data can assume one of only two possible values: zero or one. Appropriate for implementation in electronic circuitry, where values are characterized by the absence/presence of an electrical current flow. Pulse code modulation (PCM) is used to represent binary numbers electrically, as a string of high and low voltages
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Binary system (2) The binary system represents numbers using bi nary digi ts ( bits ) where each digit corresponds to a power of two.
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This note was uploaded on 03/03/2012 for the course FMT E85 taught by Professor Juanpablobello during the Fall '09 term at NYU.

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7_digital - Introduction to digital systems Juan P Bello...

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