acquisition.slides.printing

acquisition.slides.printing - CS 450: I n tro d u c tio n...

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CS 450 : Introduction to Digital Signal and Image Processing Signal and Image Acquisition
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Acquisition Devices Aperture Scanning Sensor Quantizer Output storage medium
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Apertures Point measurements are impossible Have to make measurements using a (weighted) average over some aperture time window spatial area etc.
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Apertures Size of aperture determines resolution Smaller apertures = better resolution Larger apertures = worse resolution Lenses allow a physically larger aperture to act as an effectively smaller one
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Lenses Sensor Lens Effective Aperture
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Sensor Converts light (photons) to chemical and/or electrical response Examples Silver halide crystals (film) Photoreceptors in our eyes (rods, cones) Charge-coupled device (CCD), etc.
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Noise Unavoidable random fluctuations from “correct” value Can usually be modeled as a statistical distribution with mean at the “correct” value A measured sample will vary from that mean according to the distribution
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Signal-To-Noise Ratio Measure of how “noise free” the acquired signal is
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This note was uploaded on 03/02/2012 for the course C S 450 taught by Professor Morse,b during the Winter '08 term at BYU.

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acquisition.slides.printing - CS 450: I n tro d u c tio n...

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