04 Lecture.BH

04 Lecture.BH - Greek Religion Democracy Science Classical...

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Greek Religion, Democracy, & Science Classical Greece Lecture 4 September 22, 2010 Taylor Halverson, Ph.D.
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Preliminary Items Project instructions How to use Twitter How to use TweetDeck Course Feedback 2
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Greek Religion Key ideas Religion was not about morals Religion was about ritual, about appeasing the gods 3
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Greek Religion versus Literature Greek religion did not have a god that gave  the “true” method of living so the Greeks  adopted the lifestyle of the Homeric  heroes as their standard and Homer’s  works became the “scriptures” of the  Greeks. Discussion: Do we have non-religious books today that are “scriptural” for some people?
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Religion - Theogony Theogony – “birth of the gods” “Theo” = god - (en theo siasm) “gony” = gen - Like genesis, gene, genealogy =  “birth” Hesiod (700 B.C.) Traces the descent of the gods through myths Separate race from humans Immortal characteristics Did not  give patterns for moral behavior Art and literature—method of finding purpose of life
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Religion - Delphi Temple of Apollo Ruins Artist rendition of temple of Apollo 5 th century onward, priestess (virgin) was abducted Purified herself in Castalia Spring at Delphi Entered inner sanctum of temple of Apollo Inhaled vapors that caused her to fall into a trance Priest interpreted her unintelligible words Later transition from plural gods to the one god of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle
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Religion The Olympics Founded in 776 BC Held in Olympia First event was a foot race Other events added Boxing, javelin throwing,  chariot racing, wrestling, long  jump, discus Held every 4 years until  394 AD Revived in 1896 Why was the Olympics a creative part of religion and what does it signify in religion?
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Question What is a creative way that you would teach morals to someone? 8
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Morals Aesop Slave in 550 B.C.  Wrote short stories Attention to ethics Used fables and morals to  make his points
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Questions Why are Aesop’s fables a creative way to teach and reinforce morals? Is religion morals and are morals religion? Can you have religion without morals? If religion is morals, are Aesop’s fables religion? 10
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Boy and Wolf
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Greek Science Key Ideas Greek science searching for the underlying CAUSE of all things Seeking for truth 12
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Science • Anaximander  (610-546  BC) – Fire was the  fundamental element • Heraclitus  (535-475 BC) Fundamental  concept  underlying everything  is  change – “No one can step in  the same river twice” Detail of Raphael's painting  The School of Athens , 1510– 1511. This could be a representation of Anaximander  leaning towards Pythagoras on his left.
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Science Thales First Philosopher, First scientist (625  B.C) Natural philosophy Provided evidence for conclusions
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04 Lecture.BH - Greek Religion Democracy Science Classical...

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