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Oct 20- Rome

Oct 20- Rome - Lecture 8 The Roman Empire Roman Science...

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Lecture 8 The Roman Empire Roman Science, Technology, & Art Early Christianity
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Just for fun Video comparing the size of the earth to other celestial bodies “The Real Perspective on the Solar System”
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Purpose of Class Enhance your creativity Enhance your understanding and appreciation of ancient cultures
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Write answers to these questions 1. How has your creativity developed over the past 8 weeks? 2. What is something creative you have done in the past 8 weeks? 3. How have you applied something that you have learned in this class to your life?
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The Roman Empire
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Key take-aways from this portion of lecture 1. Roman success based on: Military discipline Stable and fair laws Inclusion Appealing lifestyle Strong leaders
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Key take-aways from this portion of lecture 2. Reason Roman Empire fell apart Practical but not innovative Loss of good leaders Loss of values Reliance on mercenaries
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Rule by One Man The Roman Republic was based on the principle that “there would be no king” It is ironic, then, that the Roman Empire is characterized by the rule of single, powerful individuals
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Octavian/Augustus Caesar
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Caesar Augustus
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Caesar Augustus Ruled: 27 BC-14 AD Octavian, nephew of Julius His title for himself: Princeps civitatis Given title Augustus—“the greatest” Declared to be son of a god (Caesar deified) Auctoritas = prestige, power from trust, influence Discussion: Who else has had this kind of power? How does a leader get this kind of power? Is this power good or evil?
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27 BC – 69 AD Julio-Claudians Augustus Tiberius Gaius (Caligula) Claudius Nero Year of the Four  Emperors 69 – 96 AD Flavians Vespasian Titus Domitian 96 – 193 AD Nervan-Antonian Nerva Trajan Hadrian Antoninus Pius Marcus Aurelius Commodus 193 – 284 AD Crisis during the 3rd Century Many military emperors 284 – 308 AD Tetrarchy Diocletian 308 – 337 AD Constantinian Constantine the Great 337 – 476 AD Post-Constantinian Julian the Apostate
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27 BC – 69 AD Julio-Claudians Augustus Tiberius Gaius (Caligula) Claudius Nero Year of the Four  Emperors 69 – 96 AD Flavians Vespasian Titus Domitian 96 – 193 AD Nervan-Antonian Nerva Trajan Hadrian Antoninus Pius Marcus Aurelius Commodus 193 – 284 AD Crisis during the 3rd Century Many military emperors 284 – 308 AD Tetrarchy Diocletian 308 – 337 AD Constantinian Constantine the Great 337 – 476 AD Post-Constantinian Julian the Apostate
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Flavians Military leaders Brought stability after the “crazies” of the late Julio- Claudians Great expansion of the Empire Put down the revolts of the Jews
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27 BC – 69 AD Julio-Claudians Augustus Tiberius Gaius (Caligula) Claudius Nero Year of the Four  Emperors 69 – 96 AD Flavians Vespasian Titus Domitian 96 – 193 AD Nervan-Antonian “The Golden Age” Nerva Trajan Hadrian Antoninus Pius Marcus Aurelius Commodus 193 – 284 AD Crisis during the 3rd Century
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