chapter16 RKW

chapter16 RKW - Lecture Connections 16 | The Citric Acid...

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Lecture Connections 16 | The Citric Acid Cycle © 2009 W. H. Freeman and Company
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Glucose Song
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Only a Small Amount of Energy Available in Glucose is Captured in Glycolysis 2 G’° = -146 kJ/mol Glycolysis Full oxidation (+ 6 O 2 ) G’° = -2,840 kJ/mol 6 CO 2 + 6 H 2 O GLUCOSE
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Glycolysis ends with Pyruvate How do we get from Pyruvate into the Citric Acid Cycle. Convert it to Acetyl CoA? Why?
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In Eukaryotes, Citric Acid Cycle Occurs in Mitochondria Glycolysis occurs in the cytoplasm Citric acid cycle occurs in the mitochondrial matrix Oxidative phosphorylation occurs in the inner membrane Except succinate dehydrogenase, which is located in the inner membrane
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Conversion of Pyruvate to Acetyl-CoA Oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate Forms 2 C substrate acetyl-CoA can enter the citric acid cycle and yield energy acetyl-CoA can be used to synthesize storage lipids
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Pyruvate Dehydrogenase (PDH)
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24 – 60 copies of E 2 depending on Species. 5 cofactors or Prosthetic groups 5 times Larger than Ribosome
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Why such a complex reaction for a simple substrate?
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Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex (PDC) PDC is a large ( M r = 7.8 × 10 6 Da) multienzyme complex - pyruvate dehydrogenase (E 1 ) - dihydrolipoyl transacetylase (E 2 ) - dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (E 3 ) short distance between catalytic sites allows channeling of substrates from one catalytic site to another channeling minimizes side reactions activity of the complex is subject to regulation (ATP)
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5-Step Reaction Mechanim for Pyruvate Decarboxylation
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This note was uploaded on 03/08/2012 for the course CHEM 481 taught by Professor Wood during the Fall '10 term at BYU.

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chapter16 RKW - Lecture Connections 16 | The Citric Acid...

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