CL12-InstCondMotivMechHO

CL12-InstCondMotivMechHO - :Motivational Mechanisms...

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Conditioning and Learning Instrumental Conditioning:  Motivational  Mechanisms March 1, 2012 © John M. Ackroff 2012
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© John M. Ackroff 2012  Views of Conditioning
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© John M. Ackroff 2012  Motivation What does it mean to be motivated? Restricting access to a reinforcer so it is  available only by making the instrumental  response.
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© John M. Ackroff 2012  Associative Structure of  Instrumental Conditioning Thorndike – context  S – R – O  Stimulus context instrumental Response response Outcome
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© John M. Ackroff 2012  Law of Effect S – R association is responsible for behavior in the context in which the subject has  been previously reinforced No learning about R – O association Habits Typical responses whether or not  reinforced   Addictions Habits with physiological effects  
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© John M. Ackroff 2012  Expectations of Reward  and  S – O Association Pavlovian conditioning – signal learning Association made between contextual cues  of S and and occurrence of O   Hull and Spence S leads to instrumental response because  of Thorndikian S-R association   Eventually, R made in response to S-O  association 
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© John M. Ackroff 2012 Two-Process Theory (Rescorla and Solomon) S – O activates an emotional state Pavlovian Instrumental Transfer Test: Look for different response rates in  presence / absence of CS CS should increase responding
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© John M. Ackroff 2012  Two-Process Theory Now suppose tone paired with shock Tone suppresses pressing in Phase 3  Conclusion:  separate processes for  classically and instrumentally  conditioned responses  
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© John M. Ackroff 2012   Response Interaction  Explanation Animals classically conditioned to go to  1 side of cage via sign tracking. Animal required to make an  instrumental response on the other side  of the cage Reduced response rate - interference 
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  Response Interaction  Explanation Animals classically conditioned to make  a response – peck a key when lighted Animals instrumentally conditioned to  make same response – peck for food
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This note was uploaded on 03/07/2012 for the course 830 201 taught by Professor Leyton during the Fall '08 term at Rutgers.

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CL12-InstCondMotivMechHO - :Motivational Mechanisms...

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