Stout&Thurman

Stout&Thurman - Wisdom By Mia Marie Jamilano...

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Wisdom By Mia Marie Jamilano Professor Hand Expository Writing 101 1 November 2011 Our individualities sum up to our personalities, perspectives, and backgrounds. It’s the distinctiveness between those personalities, perspectives, and backgrounds that set us apart and determines us from one person from another. Our backgrounds and origins, such as nationality and gender, are predetermined for us, leaving those parts of our identities unalterable. Yet we are given the availability to pick and chose the characteristics that sum up to our beings. As obvious as that sounds, Robert Thurman provides a different approach of seeking your ‘self’ through his essay, “Wisdom”. Thurman, an Indo-Tibetan Buddhist Studies Professor at Columbia University, discusses how someone’s self should not be found, that if you were to act solely selfless and patient, your self will soon stumble upon you through your path in life. While Thurman preaches
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2 Buddhist processes to be selfless in reality to find that inner strength and virtue to gain your sense of self, Marilyn Stout, a clinical psychologist, yet again finds another way to intertwine reality and our ideas of self in her essay, “When I Woke Up Tuesday Morning, It was Friday”. Stout explains her patients’ uses of dissociation to help cope with troubled times and events in their lives. While the two authors use a form of letting go of reality in two separate ways, identity is still formed either way. It is the effect our past experiences due to fate that steers us to our own identities. Our sense of self is the sum of the past experiences that alter our personality and perspectives using time and patience to understand and trust our destined self. When the going gets tough, it is acceptable to leave our problems in fate’s hands because
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This note was uploaded on 03/07/2012 for the course 830 201 taught by Professor Leyton during the Fall '08 term at Rutgers.

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Stout&Thurman - Wisdom By Mia Marie Jamilano...

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