2nd CA100 Midterm - 2nd CA100 Midterm Explain the...

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2 nd CA100 Midterm Explain the differences between an informative speech and a persuasive speech Persuasive: Objective is more ambitious Audience analysis and adaptation become much more demanding Explain why speaking to persuade is especially challenging Objective is more ambitious Audience analysis and adaptation become much more demanding Must deal with audience’s attitudes Explain what it means to say that audiences engage in a mental dialogue with speakers You must anticipate possible objections the audience will raise to your point of view an answer them in your speech Define, identify, and give examples of questions of fact, value, and policy; give an example of a specific purpose statement for each Fact : -a question about the truth or falsity of an assertion (E.g)-Will the economy be better or worse next year? Who will win the Super Bowl? What college basketball team has won the most games since 1990? SP -To persuade my audience that an earthquake of 9.0 or above on the Richter scale will hit California in the next 10 years. Value : -a question about the worth, rightness, morality, and so forth of an idea or action (E.g)-What is the best movie of all time? What are the ethical responsibilities of journalists? SP -To persuade my audience that bicycle riding is the ideal form of land transportation Policy : -a question about whether a specific course of action should or shouldn’t be taken -To gain passive agreement or to gain immediate action -Always a need, a plan, and practicality (E.g)-What measures should be taken to protect the US against terrorist attacks? Should the Electoral College be abolished? SP -To persuade my audience to give blood through the Red Cross. To persuade my audience that the age for full driving privileges should be raised to 18. Identify, apply, and evaluate the use of the 4 basic methods of reasoning 1) Reasoning from specific instance-reasoning that moves from particular facts to a general conclusion a. Avoid hasty generalizations
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b. Be careful with wording 2) Reasoning from principle-reasoning that moves from a general principle to a specific conclusion a. Pay special attention to your general principle-will listeners accept it without evidence? a.i. General principle a.ii. Minor principle a.iii. Specific conclusion 3) Causal reasoning- reasoning that seeks to establish the relationship between causes and effects 4) Analogical reasoning- reasoning in which a speaker compares 2 similar cases and infers that what is true for the first case is also true for the second. a. Are the two cases being compared essentially alike? Discuss ways to assess the different types of reasoning; identify the flaws in cases of problematic reasoning Most important question: are the 2 cases being compared essentially alike? Identify and describe the 8 major logical fallacies which speakers should guard
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This note was uploaded on 03/07/2012 for the course ENTOMOLOGY 201 taught by Professor Goodman during the Spring '12 term at University of Wisconsin.

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2nd CA100 Midterm - 2nd CA100 Midterm Explain the...

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