{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Outline+5+Gilded+Age+Politics

Outline+5+Gilded+Age+Politics - Development of the United...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Development of the United States Politics in the “Gilded Age” Theme: the "Gilded Age" was an era of intense partisan loyalties-but very little in the way of policy making or reform by the national govenrment, whether controlledby'the . Democrats or Republicans. Despite unprecedented new problems created by urban, ' industrial growth, parties sponsored very little "reform" and must efforts to adjust to the new economic order came from outside the mainstream of the two-party system Prologue: The Great Strike of 1877 I. Politics of Stalemate 1n the Gilded A e A. Local Basis of Politics in the 19 Century (Ethnic/Religious loyalty) - _ A. Republican Party—free labor, big business, and mid-Western farmers - _ B. Democratic Party—urban immigrants and southern Whites - ' C. Presidential tweedle-dum and tweedleédee ‘ ' 17. Andrew Johnson (Unionist) — 1865 18. Ulysses S. Grant (Republican) »- 1868 - 19. Rutherford B. Hayes (R) - 1876 , 20. James A. Garfield (R) — 1880 .- assassinated ' 21. Chester A. Arthur (R) - 1881 ~ 22. Grover Cleveland (Democrat) - 1884 . 23. Benjamin Harrison (R) - 1888 24. Grover Cleveland (D) - 1892 25. William McKinley (R) - 1896' D. Issues: Tariff and Civil Service RefOrm E. Limits of Reform: . _ . . the Interstate Commerce Commission Act (1887)- slaying the "Octopus" ’ the Sherman Anti- Trust Act (1890)- the most hated man in America II. Politics Outside of Parties ‘ ’ A. Frances Willard and the WCTU B. Anthony Comstock and the Purity Crusaders C. Working Class Radicalism D. Populists (Omaha Platform of 1892) III. The "DisCovery of Corruption" (the Progressive alternative) Jacob Riis' How the Other Half Lives (1897) -Ida Tarbell History of Standard Oil (1903) -Lincoln Steffen‘ s Shame 0f the Cities (1904) -Upton Sinclair s The Jungle (1906) -coping with bigness -the fear of disorder _ -ethn0centrism: immigration and racism Identification: Knights of Labor, the Wobblies, Populism, Sherman Anti-Trust Act, Bryan-McKinley election, WCTU, The Jungle, Jacob Riis, Denmcratic Party, Republican Party, Anthony Comstock, Gilded Age politics . . . . The conditions which surround us best justify our cooperation: we meet in the midst of a nation brought to the verge of moral, political, and mate- rial ruin. Corruption dominates the ballot-box, the legislatures, the Congress, and touches even the er- mine‘of. the bench. The people are demoralized; most of the States have been compelled to isolate. the voters at the polling-places to prevent universal in- timidation or bribererhe newspapers are largely ‘ subsidized or muzzled; public opinion silenced; busi- ness prostrated; our homes covered with mortgages; labor impoverished; and the land concentrating in the hands of the capitalists. The urban workmen are denied the right of organization for self-protection; imported pauperized labor beats down their wages; a hireling standing army, unrecognized by our laws, is established to shoot them down, and they are rapidly degenerating into European conditions. The fruits of the toil of millions are boldly stolen to build up colossal fortunes for a few, unprecedented in the history of. mankind; and the possessors of these, in tum, despise the republic and endanger liberty. From the same prolific womb of governmental injus- tice we breed the two great classes—tramps and mil- _ lionaires. . . . « While our sympathies as a party of reform are naturally upon the side of every proposition which will tend to make men intelligent, virtuous, and tem- perate, we nevertheless regard these questions—im- portant as they are—as secondary to the great issues now pressing for solution, and upon which not only our individual prosperity but the very existence of ' free institutions depends; and we ask all men to first 4 help us to determine whether we are to have a re- public to administer before we differ as to the condi- tions upon which it is to be administered; believing that the forces of reform this day organized will never cease to move forward until every wrong is remedied, and equal rights and equal privileges se- curely established for all the men and women of this country. We declare, therefore,-—~ First. That the union of the labor forces of the United States this day consummated shall be perma— nent and perpetual; may its spirit enter all hearts for the salvation of the republic and the uplifting of mankind! Second. Wealth belongs to him who creates it, and every dollar taken from industry without an equivalent is robbery. “If any will not work, neither shall he eat.” The interests of rural and civic labor are the same; their enemies are identical. Third. We believe that the time has come when the railroad corporations will either own the people or the people must own the railroads; and, should the government enter upon the work of owningand managing all railroads, we should favor an amend- The Omaha Platform, 1892 ment to the Constitution by which all persons en- gaged in the government service shall ”be placed un- der a civil service regulation of the most rigid character, so as to prevent the increase of the power of the national administration by the use of such ad- ditional government employees. First, Money. We demand a national currency, safe, sound, and flexible, issued by the general gov- ernment only, a full legal tender for all debts, public and private, and that, without the use of banking corporations, a just, equitable, and efficient means of distribution direct to the people, at a tax not to exceed two percent per annum, to be provided as set forth in the sub-treasury plan of the Farmers’ Al- liance, or a better system; also, by payments in dis- charge of its obligations for public improvements. (a) We demand free and unlimited coinage of silver and gold at the present legal ratio of sixteen to one. (b) We demand that the amount of circulating medium be speedily increased to not less than fifty dollars per capita. (c) We demand a graduated income tax. ((1) We believe that the money of the country should be kept as much as possible in the hands of the people, and hence we demand that all state and national revenues shall be limited to the necessary expenses of the government economically and hon- ' estly administered. (e) We demand that postal savings banks be es— tablished by the government for the safe deposit of the earnings of the people and to facilitate exchange. Second, Transportation. Transportation being a means of exchange and public necessity, the govern- ment should own and operate the railroads in the in- terest of the people. (a) The telegraph and telephone, like the post- office system, being a necessity for the transmission of news, should be owned and operated by the gov- ernment in the interest of the people. Third, Land. The land, including all the natural sources of wealth, is the heritage of the people, and should not be monopolized for speculative purposes, and alien ownership of land should be prohibited. All land now held by railroads and other corpora- tions in excess of their actual needs, and all lands now owned by aliens, should be reclaimed by the 1 government and held for actual settlers only. ...
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern