Outline+8+World+War+I

Outline+8+World+War+I - Development of the United States...

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Unformatted text preview: Development of the United States World War I the Shaping of the Modern World There are citizens of the United States, 1 blush to admit, born under other flags but welcomed under our generous naturalization laws to the full freedom and opportunity of America, who have poured the poison of disloyalty into the very arteries of our national life....Such creatures of passion, disloyalty, and anarchy must be crushed out....The hand of our power should close over them at once. Woodrow Wilson, 1917 If you were born without a blanket; if you had left your wife and kids while you went west for a job and never located them since; if your job kept never kept you long enough in one place to vote; if you slept in a lousy bunk—house and ate rotten food; if every person who represented law and order beat you up how the hell do you expect a man to be patriotic? IWW worker, 1917 We are now about to accept gauge of battle with its natural foe to liberty and shall, if necessary, spend the whole force of the nation to check and nullify its pretensions and its power. We are glad, now that we see the facts with no veil of false pretense about them, to fight thus for the ultimate peace of the world and for the liberation of its peoples, the German peoples included: for the rights of nations great and small and the privilege of men everywhere to choose their way of life and of obedience. The world must be made safe for democracy Woodrow Wilson, War Message, 1917 Theme: Between 1912 and 1919 progressivism reached its high point in America, but these were also the years that modern American foreign policy took shape-~and Woodrow Wilson was an architect of both. Wilson's achievement was to attach American policy to a set of ideals he believed were universal yet which served America's interest as the world's strongest economic power. I. Origins and Nature of World War I an unimaginable war European alliance system Serbia and Austrian-Hungarian Empire modern war - killing on an unprecedented scale world war — imperialism and colonialism undone? II. Woodrow Wilson: idealism and realism democracy free trade self determination Wilson as foolish idealist? defining ideals that serve America's interests? Wilson and the birth of the "American Century" III. Wilson's Background southern (Virginia) Democrat, racist Princeton president, NJ. reform governor, southern racist high tide of progressivism under Wilson IV. American Involvement in World War I Mexico Revolution, 1911—1917, and American intervention taking sides in Europe, Wilson’s options American neutrality, British blockades and German U—boats American troops fighting WW1 IV. The War at Home fighting a war with progressive methods — a crusade for democracy? Select Service Act Selling the War with Hollywood: Committee for Public 1nformation - “Four—Minute Men” Repressing Dissent: Espionage Act (1917), Sedition Amendment (1918), and A. Mitchell Palmer V. Wilson's 14 Points at the Versailles Peace Conference open peace treaties, freedom of the seas in peace and war, removal of economic barriers between nations, armament reductions, right of self-determination for indigenous peoples, autonomy for central European peoples, League of Nations VI. Aftermath defeat of the treaty and a separate peace intervention in Russia against Lenin’s Soviet Revolution Red Scare Identification: Mexican Revolution, Wilsonian idealism, Espionage and Sedition Acts, I4 Points, Russian Intervention, Committee for Public Information Aithough Russia was at peace with Germany. Russian marauding bands dislocated German communications and supplies GERMANY Belgian/y British French American GERMAN-OCCUPIED RUSSIA Lemberg 'Vienna ' Budapest AUSTRIA-HUNGARY 'Fiume Belgrade Odessa Italian Mosul- TURKEY Furthest extent of the political and -— military control of the Central Powers by June 1918 Aleppo - Armies advancing across territory Brltlsh controlled by the Central Powers from June 1918 Territory lost by the Central Powers July to October 1918 ‘ ‘ British Allied naval blockade. depriving the Central , Powers of food and essential supplies Arab 300 miles L_.__.___l '1‘- if (V 1 Countries of the British Empire which added nearly 3 million men to the manpower of the British lsies Number of British and Empire troops who served in the war zones, over 9 million in all Number of British and Empire war dead. nearly 1 million in all. A further 2 million Empire soldiers were seriously injured Principal war zones The sewing soldiers of the Empire as a proportion of the total population: New Zealand 1 in 5 Great Britain 1 in 7 Australia “i in 10 Canada 1 in 11 Newfoundland 1 in 20 South Africa 1 in 44 lndla 1 in 225 Palestinian Front , Cameroon War Zone THE EMPIRE WAR EFFORT : Among the articles produced by Britain and the Empire for the war were: 136 million pairs of socks 63 million horseshoes 57 million shirts 47 million boots 41 million blankets 24 million caps and hats 20 million cardigans 18 million mess tins 13 million water bottles 10 million shovels and spades East African War Zone ‘ I I The British Empire at war, 1914—18 America has stood in the years past for that sort of political understanding among men which would let every man feel that his rights were the same as those of another and as good as those of another, and the mission of America in the field of the world’s commerce is to be the same: that when an American comes into that competition he comes without any arms that would enable him to conquer by force, but only’ with those peaceful influences of intelligence, a desire to serve, a knowledge of what he is about, before which everything softens and yields, and renders itself subject. ’That is the mission of America, and my interest, so far as my small part in American affairs is concerned, is to lend every bit of intelligence I have to this interesting, this vital, this all-important matter of releasing the intelligence of America for the service of mankind. Woodrow Wilson 2. Friendly Words for the Foreign Born, 1917 . . .There is no such thing as half treason. Any trea- son is all treason. And let no foreign-born man, who is to-day in the United States, comfort himself that, because he has not become a naturalized citizen, he _ owes no allegiance to the United States, and that he cannot be punished for treason to the United States. That is not the case, and it is well for us all—— whether native-born, naturalized or unnaturalized— to understand just where we each stand with rela- tion to the Government-in the crime of treason. . . . And every on ' :owes allegiance to the Gov- ernment can be of treason; the native-born man, because he was born here; the naturalized man, because he took an oath of allegiance; the un- naturalized or alien man, because he lives here for the time being. . . . My advice, therefore, to every foreign-born man and woman who is staying in the United States to- day is to keep clear of any disloyalty; keep clear of any one who counsels or advises it. Indeed, any one, native, naturalized, or alien, who knows of such dis— loyal plans, purposes, or schemes is already on dan- gerous ground, although he may not himself have done a thing; for as your friend I should tell you that there is not only treason which consists of overt acts, but there is a lesser treason which consists in knowing of treason by others against the United States and not making it known. Let me make that very plain, for it may save some people trouble. If a man or woman knows of treason against the United States, and keeps it to himself, it is like receiving stolen goods. So it is with treason, for to conceal treason is to commit treason. Now here is what the law provides about this lesser treason, or “misprison of treason,” as it is called, and it applies to all persons living in the United States, whether native-born, naturalized, or not nat- uralized, for they all owe allegiance: ' “awrhemmmxeme. ., .1 .. 208 ' ‘ .-MEMCIRS NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES. [VOL.XV, TEST. 7 ,This is;a test of common sense. Below are ten questions. Four answers are given to each question. You/are to look at the answers carefully; then make a cross in the square before the best answer to each question, as in the sample: Why do we use stoves? Because [3; they look well [3 they are black _ they keep us warm ’ they are'made of iron Here the third answer is the best one and is marked with a cross. Begin with No. 1 and keep on until time is called. _ , . SAMPLE 1 Why ought every man to be. educated? 'fBecause DY Roosevelt was educated. it makes a man more’useful 6 Why is the telephone more useful than the tele- graph? -Because . it gets a quicker answer - . D it uses more miles of wire it costs money ; [:1 it is a morerecent invention E] telephone wires can be putunder ground 7 Why-are war-ships‘painted gray? Because gray 133th . "1 is'~'cheaper than any other color E] is .more durable than other colors I] does not show dirt makes the ships harder to see 8 If you find a lost 2-year—old baby on a city street, what should you do? D .take him to the post office D ask him where he lives and take him there .. ask the police to help you or leave him with them ‘ ' if he is a nice child take him to your home D and keep him DUE] some educated people are wise 2 Why ought a grocer to own an automobile? Because it looks pretty 25- I l I. ‘ H.- X it is useful in his business" I DID it uses rubber tires a r. -. ' ‘- — a it saves railroad .fare' ’ .1 I I i _ 3 Why is beef better food than'caibbage? Because [3 it is harder to obtain '- D it tastes better p it is more nourishing ' D it comes 'from animals " 4 Why are doctors useful? Because they _ heal the sick D know about herbs" E] understand human nature-i“ m.“ .~~ _ 9 -'Why is agriculture valuable? Because it supplies luxuries it makes work for the unemployed the farmers feed the nation the great men are raised on farms E] always have pleasant dispositions 5 Why judge a man by what. he doesnrather than by ' what he says? Because ' ‘ V .1 ' Ditiswmngtotellalie . l I what a man'does shows what he really is E] _ it is wrong to judge anybody E] a deaf man' cannot hear what is said 10 Why is tennis good exercise? 'Because D it is played with rubber balls D it demands clear eyes it is very exciting Go to No. 6 above it calls for vigorous movement mg. 7.—Group Examinations a and b, Form A. Test 7. Practical Judgment. 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This note was uploaded on 03/07/2012 for the course US HISTORY 512:104 taught by Professor Stevenmcgrail during the Spring '10 term at Rutgers.

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Outline+8+World+War+I - Development of the United States...

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