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Crotty ch4SG

Crotty ch4SG - Crotty Michael 1998 The Foundations of...

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Crotty, Michael. 1998. The Foundations of Social Research: Meaning and Perspective in the Research Process . Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Chapter Four: Interpretivism Interpretivism argues that the social sciences must adapt their scientific approach to best fit their unique subject matter: human meaning. While for some this means that social science should not adopt the methods of natural science (i.e., nomothetic laws or quantitative research), for most others it means that while we might occasionally use a nomothetic explanatory approach the primary focus must always be on understanding the meaning of human action. Crotty reviews some of the origins of interpretive sociology primarily through discussing Weber’s work (something you should have discussed in 310). After reading this section, move straight into the discussion of symbolic Interactionism. According to Blumer, what are the three basic interactionist assumptions? What is pragmatism? How does it attempt to understand human action?
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Crotty ch4SG - Crotty Michael 1998 The Foundations of...

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