Sampling%2C+Cont+_+How+we+measure (2)

Sampling%2C+Cont+_+How+we+measure (2) -...

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Review:  Key Concepts in  Sampling Sample : representative subset of population  (universe). For example the empty nesters  since not all empty nesters in the world were  selected.  Representativeness : How closely a sample  matches its population in terms of the  characteristics we want to study Probability vs. non-probability sampling Sampling error : Degree to which a  sample s characteristics differ from the  population s characteristics
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Why is random selection  important? Random sampling increases our confidence that the sample we’ve selected is like the whole population.
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Case Study Marriage in America
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Marriage in America Who conducted the study? Pew Research Center Who funded the study? Pew Charitable Trusts Who else contributed to the research design?
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Who else contributed to the  research design? The Pew Research Center thanks four  academic experts on the  contemporary family and two senior  editors at TIME who brainstormed  with the project team in Washington,  D.C. during the planning phase of this  study.  The scholars are Sara McLanahan of  Princeton University, Andrew Cherlin of  The Johns Hopkins University, Frank 
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How was the population  sampled? Report is based on a new nationwide telephone survey of 2,691 adults ages 18 and older. It was conducted from Oct. 1-21, 2010. A total of 1,520 interviews were completed with respondents contacted by landline telephone and 1,171 with those contacted on their cellular phone. In an effort to capture the experiences and attitudes of those living in both traditional and less traditional family arrangements, the survey included oversamples of three key groups: (1) adults who are divorced or separated and have at least one child younger than age 18; (2) adults who are living with a partner and have at least one child younger than age 18; (3) adults who have never been married and are not currently living with a partner and have at least one child younger than age 18. Interviews were done in English and Spanish by Princeton Survey Research Associates International
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Marriage in America Who conducted the study? Pew Research Center Who funded the study? Pew Charitable Trusts Who else contributed to the research design? How was the population sampled? What did they find?
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Marriage in America:  Practice Questions Argue for an improvement you would make to the  sampling strategy  employed in this study. What is the 
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Sampling%2C+Cont+_+How+we+measure (2) -...

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