44471 - Dr. Yoga Nathan Senior Lecturer in Public Health...

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Unformatted text preview: Dr. Yoga Nathan Senior Lecturer in Public Health GEMS UL Describe the historical and social changes that have occurred in the meanings associated with death. Explore the social issues surrounding the so-called 'medicalisation of death and dying' in modern health care systems. 08/03/12 2 Throughout the world, death and the rituals that surround it are steeped in taboos. Death is celebrated, embraced and feared. Around death and the dead, cultures put in place diverse restrictions and practices associated with clothing, food and ritual. Nonetheless, death, dying, and grieving in the traditional model were an important part of everyday cultural practices. And the rituals they spawned connected dying and grieving persons to a broader community and set of meanings. In this way, the ordeal of dying was never just personal, it was communal. These great ceremonies, along with their deep religious and social meanings, accompanied dying persons into their deaths. They provided a sense of strength for the broader community that was being threatened by the loss of one of its members. Additionally, these traditional rituals were a healing balm to dying persons and their intimates, offering strength and comfort to both. In the twentieth century, the social and psychological landscape was transformed, redefining modern cultural, social, and personal experiences of death. The result of this transformation is that dying, once an integral and meaningful part of social life, has become a source of terror and thus largely vanquished from public visibility. Four major social trends are responsible: (1) the abdication of community to a pervasive sense of individualism; (2) the replacement of a predominantly religious worldview with one that is secular; (3) the sweeping power that materialism holds on the values, interests, and behaviours in modern society; and (4) the influential place of science and technology in daily life....
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44471 - Dr. Yoga Nathan Senior Lecturer in Public Health...

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