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composite - Test UBC Calculus Online Course Notes Composite...

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Test! UBC Calculus Online Course Notes Composite Functions Composite functions are so common that we usually don't think to think to label them as composite functions. However, they arise any time a change in one quantity produces a change in another which, in turn, produces a change in a third quantity. Does that sound confusing? Don't worry, an example will make things clear. An Example For this example, we'll assume that the number of humans living on the coast affects the number of whales in nearby coastal waters. Since whales eat plankton, the number of whales will affect the number of plankton in the waters. Let's be more specific. Since whales don't like all the noise that people make, they move out of an area when too many people move in. If we denote the number of thousands of people by x and the number of whales by y, a simple model would be that . Object 1 Object 2 Now since the whales are eating the plankton, more whales mean less plankton. If we measure the
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