02 - Chemistry 1000 Lecture 2 Light Marc R Roussel A bit of history Two dominant theories on the nature of light going back to ancient times

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Chemistry 1000 Lecture 2: Light Marc R. Roussel
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A bit of history Two dominant theories on the nature of light, going back to ancient times: Corpuscular (particle) theory: Explains some observations, like the straight-line propagation of light rays I The Indian Vaisheshika philosophical school (6th–5th century BC) held that light is made of atoms of fire. I Alhacen’s Book of Optics (1021) hypothesized that light is made of particles emitted by illuminated objects. I Newton’s Opticks (1704) contained a detailed corpuscular theory.
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Wave theory: Explained most properties of light I Hooke (1665) and Huygens (1690) both presented wave theories of light. I Faraday (1847) proposed that light is an electromagnetic wave. I Maxwell (1862) showed that electromagnetic theory predicted waves. Triumph of Maxwell’s theory: Discovery of radio waves by Hertz (1886–87)
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Electromagnetic spectrum I From shortest to longest wavelength (highest to lowest energy): gamma rays, X rays, ultraviolet, visible, infrared, microwave, radio
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This note was uploaded on 03/03/2012 for the course CHEM 1000 taught by Professor Marc during the Fall '06 term at Lethbridge College.

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02 - Chemistry 1000 Lecture 2 Light Marc R Roussel A bit of history Two dominant theories on the nature of light going back to ancient times

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