03 - Chemistry 1000 Lecture 3: Wave-particle duality Marc...

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Chemistry 1000 Lecture 3: Wave-particle duality Marc R. Roussel
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de Broglie (matter) waves de Broglie showed that λ = h / p also applies to particles for which p = mv Prediction: particles (electrons, neutrons, etc.) should diffract like light under appropriate conditions Modern methods based on this fact: transmission electron microscopy, neutron diffraction
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Thermal neutrons Nuclear reactors produce a lot of “thermal” neutrons. These are neutrons which have been equilibrated to a temperature near room temperature. Typically, such neutrons travel at speeds of 2.2 km/s or so. The mass of a neutron is 1 . 6750 × 10 - 27 kg. p = mv = (1 . 6750 × 10 - 27 kg)(2 . 2 × 10 3 m / s) = 3 . 7 × 10 - 24 kg m / s λ = h / p = 6 . 626 069 57 × 10 - 34 J / Hz 3 . 7 × 10 - 24 kg m / s = 0 . 18 nm = similar to bond lengths or to spacings between atoms in crystals
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Formula Applies to c = λν light (or other waves) E = h ν light (photons) p = mv ordinary particles p = h both
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Emission spectroscopy spectrum analyzer gas
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This note was uploaded on 03/03/2012 for the course CHEM 1000 taught by Professor Marc during the Fall '06 term at Lethbridge College.

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03 - Chemistry 1000 Lecture 3: Wave-particle duality Marc...

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