19 - Chemistry 1000 Lecture 19: Hydrogen Marc R. Roussel...

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Unformatted text preview: Chemistry 1000 Lecture 19: Hydrogen Marc R. Roussel The nonmetallic (?) group 1 element I Hydrogen is usually placed on periodic tables in group 1 due to its single (valence) electron. I Diatomic gas at room temperature I Electronegativity: 2.1 I Electrical resistivity of liquid hydrogen over 2200K and above 140GPa: 5 10- 6 m Hydrides Binary hydrogen compounds (compounds of H and one other element) are called hydrides . Types of hydrides: Covalent hydrides: e.g. H 2 O, CH 4 Some covalent hydrides (notably H 2 O) display significant ionic character, as evidenced by their dissociation into ions in water. Ionic hydrides: e.g. NaH, CaH 2 For H and Na, = 2 . 1- . 9 = 1 . 2. We would normally predict this compound to be covalent, but it behaves as if its an ionic compound of Na + and H- . Metallic hydrides: e.g. palladium hydride Preparation of hydrogen Steam reforming of natural gas: CH 4(g) + H 2 O (g) CO (g) + 3H 2(g) Coal gasification: C (s) + H 2 O (g) CO (g) + H 2(g)...
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19 - Chemistry 1000 Lecture 19: Hydrogen Marc R. Roussel...

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