briefs - Chemistry 3250 Writing good technical briefs Marc...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Chemistry 3250 Writing good technical briefs Marc R. Roussel The first commandment of writing: Know thy audience. I Your first thought when writing anything should go to who your audience is. I Who will read what you are writing? I What expertise can your readers reasonably be expected to have? I What terminology are they familiar with? I What do they need or want to know? Two types of technical briefing notes Informational briefing notes: intended to relay information only Persuasive briefing notes: intended to persuade the audience to adopt a particular course of action Know thy audience (continued) I For a document to be distributed to a small audience (less than 10 people), aim for every single member of the audience to understand everything on some level. I For larger audiences, this ideal may not be possible. I For an informational briefing note, aim to write a note that can be fully understood by the people who need the information, possibly the technical staff, but also possibly...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 03/03/2012 for the course CHEM 3250 taught by Professor Roussel during the Fall '06 term at Lethbridge College.

Page1 / 9

briefs - Chemistry 3250 Writing good technical briefs Marc...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online